(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-803)

(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-803)

(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-803) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Hawleys: TAD 80 (80 point smith!) Fujishiro: TADAKUNI HARIMA NO DAIJÔ [KEIAN 1648 HIZEN] SHINTÔ JÔSAKU He is the son of Hizen Yoshiie, and his family name is Hashimoto. In the beginning he inscribed the “MA” of Harima no Daijô as the “MA” of rub. [TN: The bottom radical in the kanji is the radical of “TE”, or hand, rather than “ISHI” or stone. Look at the fourth and tenth items in the third phrase.] In looking at his works from Kan’ei to Kanbun, the older ones say HARIMA NYÛDÔ TAITETSU, and works can be seen which have a good form, ji is ko-moku, hamon is chû-suguba or an exuberant midareba. (Wazamono) Signatures:- HIZEN JÛ HARIMA NO DAIJÔ FUJIWARA TADAKUNI- HARIMA NO DAIJÔ FUJIWARA TADAKUNI- HIZEN JÛ HARIMA NYÛDÔ FUJIWARA TAITETSU This is a very fine example of a sword made by the first generation Tadakuni. The hada is very beautiful and the overall shape of this sword is very elegant. This smith also had the title of HARIMA NO DAIJO. He was in the Shodai Tadayoshi Mon, and worked around Kan’ei (1624-1644). The Nidai Tadakuni also had the Title of Harima no Kami, but most of the swords signed that way are by the Shodai in his later years. Hirosada was a Hizen swordsmith and half brother to Shodai Tadayoshi. During the rise of Tadayoshi, he likely studied under the Shodai and changed his name to Yoshiie, taking the last half of Tadayoshi’s name. His own sons in order of birth were also students of the Hizen...
PROJECT WAKAZASHI (fss-799)

PROJECT WAKAZASHI (fss-799)

PROJECT WAKAZASHI (fss-799) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale PLEASE NOTE: WE HAVE BEEN ASKED BY MANY OF OUR CLIENTS TO LIST THEIR ITEMS THAT ARE IN NEED OF RESTORATION ETC. FOLLOWING IS THE FIRST OF SEVERAL BLADES THAT WILL BE LISTED AT A VERY REASONABLE PRICE. WE DO NOT GUARANTEE SIGNATURES ETC. AND EACH PIECE IS SOLD AS IS. WE DO HOWEVER GUARANTEE THERE ARE NO FATAL FLAWS. WE TRY TO PRESENT BLADES THAT ARE WORTHY OF RESTORATION. YOUR DUE DILIGENCE IS ADVISED AND YOU MAY FIND A GEM LURKING AMONGST THESE ONCE VALUED TREASURES!!  ALL ITEMS ARE PRICED ACCORDINGLY. A nicely preserved signed “YOKOYAMA KOZUKE DAIJO FUJIWARA SUKESADA” wakazashi that has very nice workmanship and a active hamon. This blade is ubu and signed with a long signature. A collection of activity may be found with a proper polish. This is a great looking blade with good possibilities if polished. The condition of this piece is in a very restorable condition as can be seen in the pictures. The pictures not do justice to this sword.  The hada is very well forged with a very tight itame. The mounts are original and add to the overall value of this item. A Bizen tang and shape can be seen as well as the workmanship. Mei:  YOKOYAMA KOZUKE DAIJO FUJIWARA SUKESADA Date: Edo (1700’s-1800’s) Nagasa: 21-3/4 inches Sori: 11.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 31.4 mm Width at the yokote: 21.2 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 7.1 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: Itame/mokume Hamon: Midare Boshi: Maru Condition: old polish Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold On Hold Asking price: $900.00 (shipping and insurance included) Email us if...
HIGO MITSUYO (fss-784)

HIGO MITSUYO (fss-784)

HIGO MITSUYO (fss-784) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here A rare wakazashi by MITSUYO also pronounced MITSUSHIRO with the pseudonym of Hata , surname Ito and is said to have originated in Yamashiro. He stayed in Seki in Mino and then was adopted into the Echu-no-kami SADAYUKI in Owari where he broke off relations to become independent. The blade is signed on both sides ” HIGO NO KAMI HATA MITSUYO” and stating that this was made with Nanbam tetsu.Fortune made him work exclusively for a great swordsman Yagyu-renyasai TOSHIKANE then later learned from Tsushima-no-kami TSUNEMITSU by his mediation. He enjoyed an official district title of Higo-no-kami that was granted by the Imperial Court during the Kanbun era (1661-), he lived in Nishi-kaji-cho (now Nishiki-2-chome, Naka-award, Nagoya) then moved to Minami Monzen-machi.There is a well-known work by Hata MITSUYO, a wakizashi named Oni-no Houcho that was exclusively made for: Yagyu-renyu-TOSHIKANE and is his most distinguished work constructed with great pains and also the most famed Daisho-set of Kago-tsurube and Sasa-no-tsuyu which had been owed by Yagyu-renya TOSHIKANE during his lifetime.In the Tokugawa Art Museum collection, an odd shaped wakizashi work of Ito Higo no kami Hata Mitsuyo for Yagyu Toshinobu , tested to vivisect two bodies and a wakizashi of “Go YOSHIHIRO” a reproduction of the work of Tsushima-no-kami TSUNEMITSU both have been treasures of the Owari Tokugawa feudal clan and also the Owari Yagyu swordmans school. The number of extant works by the swordsmith MITSUYO is comparatively small because they were only made to order for the Owari yagyu school of swordsmanship.Copper finished Habaki collar, preserved in Shirasaya, a plain wood mounting.Good old polish/Condition scale: good (using a...
Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Bungo province in Kyushu produced such excellent sword-smiths as Yukihira in the Koto times. The Bungo Takada school was founded by Tomoyuki in the Nanbokucho period. Tomoyuki is considered to have been a superior sword-smith. With the passage of time it is generally felt that the quality and style declined and by the Muromachi period all of the works were pretty much the same. There are different schools of thought on the quality of Bungo works made in the Shinto period. Members of this school are also known as the Fuijwara Takada because they used Fujiwara as a family name in their signatures. An immediate response from many “sword experts” when Bungo works are mentioned is that they are not swords of great quality. Others feel that they are good swords. Perhaps the foundation of this difference of opinion is that if you look at the structure of Bungo Takada swords, you will see that they were made to satisfy practical rather than artistic needs. Indeed, at times they were sought out because of their cutting ability and sturdiness. Bungo and Fujiwara takeda both used many different styles of hamon due to the transference of knowledge from the many schools in close vicinity to them. It is said that the founder of the Bungo Takada school was Tomomitsu or Tomoyuki. Takada Swordsmiths in the Shinto age engraved the last name “Fujiwara”, and so they are called the Fujiwara Takada. One of the neighbors of the Takada school was the Hizen school. Hizen sword makers were controlled by Nabeshima daimyo...
Yamato Masanori (fss-733)

Yamato Masanori (fss-733)

Yamato Masanori (fss-733)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale One of the true masters of Keicho Shinto. This smith can be found in most books and especially the ” Masters of Keicho Shinto by Markus Sesko “.. There is an outstanding gunome midare hamon. The hamon has an abundant amount of hataraki/activity and in a fresh polish will stand out beautifully. There are many tobyaki/yubashiri above the hamon. The hada is very clear and has a milky appearance and is well forged.  This is mounted in shirasaya with silver rain storm style habaki.   This sword is from an old collection and is papered to Den Masanori. Masanori was from the Yamada (山田) family and signed his name in early years with the characters (正法). He came originally from Miyatsu (宮津) in Tango province and was a late smith of the lineage of SanjōYoshinori (吉則). Via a stopover in Yamashiro, he moved to Fukui (福井) in Echizen province where he became a student of Kanenori (兼法). We know date signatures from the 13th year of Keichō(1608) to the fourth year of Keian (慶安, 1651). He had one successor who moved later to Edo. Although Masanori was mostly active somewhat later than Keichō, his early works are nevertheless interpreted in Keichō-shintōstyle. We can see a strong resemblance to Mino, or to be precise to Sue-Seki and Kanefusa (兼房) in his works, but certain blades remind of Hizen Tadahiro, Echizen Yasutsugu, or of the Horikawa school. A fine example of the older style blades this sword is polished and mounted in shirasaya “. A fresh polish would greatly enhance the value of the...