BUNGO NORIYUKI (fss-858)

BUNGO NORIYUKI (fss-858)

BUNGO NORIYUKI (fss-858) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautifully crafted sword with outstanding hada in a rare shape with longish kissaki, this blade is signed ” BUNGO JU FUJIWARA NORIYUKI”.  The blade is a longish wakazashi which is ubu with one hole and signed. A signed Shinto wakazashi that has a hoso-suguha hamon with hataraki. A nice well worked mokume with much ji-nie.  A good blend of activity can be seen and appreciated within this blade in the Shinto fujiwara takada tradition. The Nakago is a very nice Iriyama-gata in shape. There is a silver foil habaki  This blade comes with a paper from the nthk authenticating the age and maker.  It is in an older polish with a very high end Japanese shirasaya accentuated with horn throughout with an ivory mekugi trim. The pictures do not do justice to this sword and is striking in hand.  It has some hataraki and ko-nie appear.  The hada is well forged with an appearance  of mokume with Ji-nie. The boshi is ko-maru and a bit longish . This wakazashi has an elegant shape and is very well balanced. It is very rare to find an U-no-kobu-zukuri of this length.  This sword would be a good project sword to mount in fittings some day. A great family of Takada smiths whose blades were once sought after by many samurai. They were collectively known as the 3 “YUKI’S”. A family lead by the grandfather Sadayuki then to the father Masayuki and most prolifically the son Noriyuki who is the creator of this blade. A rare shape and reminds one of the Hizen works which greatly influenced this group of smiths. “In Shinto times the...
Echizen Yasutsugu (fss-855)

Echizen Yasutsugu (fss-855)

Echizen Yasutsugu (fss-855) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a good example of the 3rd generation Yasutsugu.  The quality of this sword is very good and has no flaws.  It was a family sword that was mounted in WWII for the war.  It was mounted with an antique tsuba and antique menuki.  This is not common and adds an interesting detention to the mounts.  The blade has good activity and the hada/grain is very rich and dark looking. This sword is in full polish and is in a shirasaya.  The mounts are held together with a wooden tsunagi.  The sword comes with papers from the Nihon Tōken Hozon Kai (日本刀剣保存会) ‒ NTHK from Japan (Japanese sword preservation society). Info on smith:YASUTSUGU (康継), 3rd gen., Kanbun (寛文, 1661-1673), Musashi – “Yasutsugu nanban-tetsu o motte Bushū Edo ni oite kore o saku” (康継以南蛮鉄於武州江戸作之, “made by Yasutsugu with nanban-tetsu in Edo in Musashi province”), real name Shimosaka Umanosuke (下坂右馬助), he adopted later the first name Ichinojō (市之丞), son of the 2nd gen. Yasutsugu, he was not of age when his father died and so a succession dispute arouse which resulted in the splitting to an Edo and an Echizen branch of the Yasutsugu school, it was settled that both were allowed to call themselves 3rd gen., according to tradition he was fully trained by his uncle and he worked later for the bakufu, we know date signatures from the third year of Kanbun (1663) to the third year of Enpō (延宝, 1675), he worked in the style of the 2nd gen. but did not reach his quality, he...
(Yasakuni) Yasunobu (fss-853)

(Yasakuni) Yasunobu (fss-853)

(Yasukuni) Yasunobu (fss-853) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale An Impressive Yasukuni Shrine sword by the swordsmith Yasunobu. His full name Murakami Yasunobu and given name is Ensaku from Yamagata prefecture.According to the translation by Kenji Mishina for the JSS:He became a member of the NTKF ( Nihonto Tenren Kai Foundation ) 10/15/33 which made approx. 1000 swords.Given his Yasukuni smith name on 1/11/39 by War Minister, Itagaki Seishiro.Left 8/15/45 after the defeat by the Allied Forces.Donated a sword to the Yasakuni shrine 2/39.Donated a sword to the festival for the 700th anniversary of retired-Emporer Gotoba 3/39.Won the Chairman Award at the 2nd Gunto Tenran Kai 12/21/44His lineage: Ikeda Yasumitsu ( Ikko or Kazumitsu )He was making agricultural tools under the tutelage of Ikeda Ikko in Yamagata prefecture. This impressive blade is in pristine condition. The polish is outstanding and truly shows off the magnificence of the Yasukuni smiths workmanship. As most Yasukuni blades this is a brilliantly controlled Sugu-ha with a very tight Ko-Itame / Ko-Mokume Hada. The boshi is in Maru with no flaws to be found. The Habaki is finished in copper. And not to understate this completed with a wonderfully done Shira-saya of Honoki.Anyone interested in owning a truly perfect example of a Yasukuni Shrine blade by a noted Yasukuni Shrine Smith should own this sword or add it to their collection. This is a link to information about the Yasakuni shrine.  It has a long and extensive history and is a place that that the Japanese people visit regularly.   YASAKUNI SHRINE Mei: Yasunobu Date: Showa era Nagasa: 24-5/8 inches Sori: 15.0 mm Width at...
Ishidô Unju Korekazu (fss-850)

Ishidô Unju Korekazu (fss-850)

Ishidô Unju Korekazu (fss-850) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Ishido Korekazu was a nephew of Kato Chounsai Tsunatoshi, He was taught and learned from him and he succeeded the Ishido familyas the seventh generation, he passed away in 1894 at the age of 75.He made So-den bizen den style which is a combination of Bizen and Soshu den style.The First generation Korekazu was skilled in making Bizen den style with beautiful Utsuribut the7th generation Korekazu made swords in the Soshu style.This sword was made on a day in the second month Keiô three (1867), year of the hare.This sword is a combination of gunome/ choji midare within a notare blend hamon which is very rear bright and clear. The activity is amazuing and unusually clear with multitudes of hataraki such as sunagashi, kinsuji. Ko-nie and a wonderful frosting of nie can be seen on the habuchi. There are swirts of mokume as well as masame make up this eye catching hada.There is horimono on both sides odf the blade. A masterful carving of a cherry blossom tree as well as a poem in Buddhist calligraphy and Sanskrit bonji.The mounts keep in theme the advent of the cherry blossom. In Japan, cherry blossoms symbolize clouds due to their nature of blooming en masse, besides being an enduring metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life, an aspect of Japanese cultural tradition that is often associated with Buddhist influence,] and which is embodied in the concept mono no aware. The association of the cherry blossom with mono no aware dates back to 18th-century scholar Motoori Norinaga The transience of the...
Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849)

Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849)

Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Yamashiro kami Fujiwara Kunikiyo is a son of Shimada Sukemune.born at Shinshu Matsumoto province.After that he studied under Horikawa Kunihiro.He changed his name to Kunikiyo and after Kanei 4th, he got the title of the Yamashiro Daijo.and after that he changed it to Yamashiro no Kami.After his great master Kunihiro passed away, he moved to Matsumoto Shinsyu province and from thereHe moved to Echizen province and followed Daimyo Matsudaira who was ordered to move Echizenby Tokugawa Shogun. This era is his most skilled years.He passed away Keian 2nd at 60 years of age..Kunikiyo is famous for his style of sugu-ha and hada akin to Hizen Tadahiro and can be mistaken for the best of Hizen Tadahiro work. The hada can appear to be veryb similar to honoku hada made dfamous by the Hizen school but with a Horikawa Kunihiro flare. This is an exceptional Daisho that high end collectors look for and cherish when found. Dr. Kanzan Sato, former director of the NBTHK (the sword museum ofJapan) writes in his book The Japanese Sword  that Yamashiro no Kami Kunikiyo was the most famous swordsmith in the Shinto (Edoperiod) that was granted permission to stamp the 16-petal kiku-mon imperial family chrysanthemum on the nakago of his swords. Kunikiyo first left his hometown of Suruga province to Kyoto and became a star student of grandmaster swordsmith Horikawa Kunihiro. He received the Horikawa kanji character for Kuni whereupon he became Kunikiyo. He left Kyoto in 1614 after his master’s death. Kunikiyo was retained by the powerful daimyo (lord) MatsudairaTadamasa and moved to Fukui to join him in 1624....