(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-860)

(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-860)

(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-860) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale TADAKUNI (Hizen) Tadakuni Fujishiro:TADAKUNI HARIMA NO DAIJÔ [KEIAN 1648 HIZEN] SHINTÔ JÔSAKU                 He is the son of Hizen Yoshiie, and his family name is Hashimoto.  In the beginning he inscribed the “MA” of Harima no Daijô as the “MA” of rub.  [TN: The bottom radical in the kanji is the radical of “TE”, or hand, rather than “ISHI” or stone. Look at the fourth and tenth items in the third phrase.]  In looking at his works from Kan’ei to Kanbun, the older ones say HARIMA NYÛDÔ TAITETSU, and works can be seen which have a good form, ji is ko-moku, hamon is chû-suguba or an exuberant midareba.  (Wazamono) Signatures:            HIZEN JÛ HARIMA NO DAIJÔ FUJIWARA TADAKUNI Item description:This is an excellent wakazashi made by a high level “jo-saku” smith.  This sword is in great condition and has a very well made hada in a ko-mokume styes with some course areas.  The hamon is extremely active and exuberant.  This is typical of Tadakuni.  The sword is in original mounts that show some wear but the fitting are in good condition and its complete. This wonderful old wakazashi has many things going for it and would be a fine sword to add to any collection. Mei: HARIMA NO DAIJÔ FUJIWARA TADAKUNI Date: (Edo) SHINTO 1600’s Nagasa: 21″ inches Sori: 12.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 28.7 mm Width at the yokote: 21.1 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.5 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: ko-mokume Hamon: Midare Gunome Boshi: Maru Condition: Polished Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold...
Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849)

Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849)

Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Yamashiro kami Fujiwara Kunikiyo is a son of Shimada Sukemune.born at Shinshu Matsumoto province.After that he studied under Horikawa Kunihiro.He changed his name to Kunikiyo and after Kanei 4th, he got the title of the Yamashiro Daijo.and after that he changed it to Yamashiro no Kami.After his great master Kunihiro passed away, he moved to Matsumoto Shinsyu province and from thereHe moved to Echizen province and followed Daimyo Matsudaira who was ordered to move Echizenby Tokugawa Shogun. This era is his most skilled years.He passed away Keian 2nd at 60 years of age..Kunikiyo is famous for his style of sugu-ha and hada akin to Hizen Tadahiro and can be mistaken for the best of Hizen Tadahiro work. The hada can appear to be veryb similar to honoku hada made dfamous by the Hizen school but with a Horikawa Kunihiro flare. This is an exceptional Daisho that high end collectors look for and cherish when found. Dr. Kanzan Sato, former director of the NBTHK (the sword museum ofJapan) writes in his book The Japanese Sword  that Yamashiro no Kami Kunikiyo was the most famous swordsmith in the Shinto (Edoperiod) that was granted permission to stamp the 16-petal kiku-mon imperial family chrysanthemum on the nakago of his swords. Kunikiyo first left his hometown of Suruga province to Kyoto and became a star student of grandmaster swordsmith Horikawa Kunihiro. He received the Horikawa kanji character for Kuni whereupon he became Kunikiyo. He left Kyoto in 1614 after his master’s death. Kunikiyo was retained by the powerful daimyo (lord) MatsudairaTadamasa and moved to Fukui to join him in 1624....
Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Bungo province in Kyushu produced such excellent sword-smiths as Yukihira in the Koto times. The Bungo Takada school was founded by Tomoyuki in the Nanbokucho period. Tomoyuki is considered to have been a superior sword-smith. With the passage of time it is generally felt that the quality and style declined and by the Muromachi period all of the works were pretty much the same. There are different schools of thought on the quality of Bungo works made in the Shinto period. Members of this school are also known as the Fuijwara Takada because they used Fujiwara as a family name in their signatures. An immediate response from many “sword experts” when Bungo works are mentioned is that they are not swords of great quality. Others feel that they are good swords. Perhaps the foundation of this difference of opinion is that if you look at the structure of Bungo Takada swords, you will see that they were made to satisfy practical rather than artistic needs. Indeed, at times they were sought out because of their cutting ability and sturdiness. Bungo and Fujiwara takeda both used many different styles of hamon due to the transference of knowledge from the many schools in close vicinity to them. It is said that the founder of the Bungo Takada school was Tomomitsu or Tomoyuki. Takada Swordsmiths in the Shinto age engraved the last name “Fujiwara”, and so they are called the Fujiwara Takada. One of the neighbors of the Takada school was the Hizen school. Hizen sword makers were controlled by Nabeshima daimyo...
KANESAKI WAKAZASHI (fss-715)

KANESAKI WAKAZASHI (fss-715)

KANESAKI WAKAZASHI (fss-715)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful wakazashi from the koto period attributed to Kanesaki of the tensho (1573-1592) periodwith unique workmanship of the mino den. This longish blade sports a picture perfect sugata with a longish kissaki. There is a horimono in the form of bohi which stops just above the yokote area. This Bohi finishes in the machi area and is rounded called maru-dome. Horimono such as this example are relatively rare in koto blades but accentuates the overall shape of this sword and adds to its period sugata. The tang is longish and ubu with one hole and finished as Ha agari kurijiri. The kissaki can almost be classified as O-kissaki, also there is small tempering at the boshi and is favoring notare-komi.The hada is a swirling patten of itame with Chikei and ji-nie can be found. The hamon is very unusual with a mountainess notare with gunome-midare, there are wisps of yubashiri forming into tobyaki in places running through the length of the blade above the hamon. These areas are cloud like floating above the hamon. The extreme health of this blade is something to be seen. This blade was mounted in shirasaya with a mekugi of ebony with a matching ebony wood habaki which shows the pride that the owner had in this sword. The unique characteristics along with the beautiful sugata of the blade papered to koto, Kanesaki mino den of the Tensho period. Mei: Mumei Date: Koto-tensho period (1573-1592) Nagasa: 21-1/2 inches Sori: 12.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 33.4 mm Width at the yokote: 25.0 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 8.1 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: Itame/mokume Hamon: Midare Gunome Boshi: Maru Condition: Good polish...
Echizen Kanenori (fss-713)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-713)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-713)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale   This stunning Echizen blade from the Shinto era comes in koshirai and is in a fine Japanese polish. The work on this sword is very elegant and exciting at the same time. In the hamon you can see tsunagashi and kinsuji with a well defined habuchi with some ko-nie to frost the top and in the valleys are much Nie to be seen.. The hada is well forged and in great shape for such beauty of a blade with some masame running here and there entwined with itame and mokume. Ji-nie appears. The style is that of shinogi-zukuri with double bohi carved. The tang is signed: Chikugo no Kami Fujiwara Kanenori Echizen-jû -on the reverse 2nd generation Echizen Kanenori (包則) From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmith, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino bldes, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and so a downright wave of migration of Mino/Seki swordsmiths can be seen, especially in the neighboring provinces of Owari and Echizen. As for Echizen, the province also gave a new home to many formerly Ômi-based Shimosaka smiths, thus we use classifications like “Echizen-Seki” (越前関) and “Echizen-Shimosaka” (越前下坂) to refer to these two different currents. The “trend-setters” of the Echizen-Seki group were first and foremost...