Kunihisa wakizashi (fss-911)

Kunihisa wakizashi (fss-911)

Kunihisa wakizashi (fss-911) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Kunihisa wakizashi in need of restoration.  We feel the signature is fine.  The temper line or hamon although difficult to see is all there.  This is a solid blade that has history and should be restored. It came from an older collection and has not been touched since World War II I would assume.  This antique sword was made in the 1600s-1700s or thereabouts. It comes in original mounts and this priced accordingly because of condition. However we do feel that this word will polish out fine.   Mei: Kunihisa Date: Edo (1600’s-1700’s) Nagasa: 17-5/8 inches Sori: 13.5 mm Width at the ha-machi: 28.9 mm Width at the yokote: 21.4 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.7 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Condition: needs polish Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold On Hold Asking price: $1,300.00 (shipping and insurance included) Email us if your interested in this item and remember to include the order number for this item: fss-911. info@nihontoantiques.com How To Order Information Click to Enlarge Image Subscribe for the Latest Updates!Join our mailing list to receive the latest News & Updates from Nihonto Antiques. SUBSCRIBE You have Successfully Subscribed! Your email address will be kept private & will only be used to send updates from this site! For Sale 6 Bare Blades (fss-913)September 25, 2022 Katana (fss-912)September 25, 2022 Kunihisa wakizashi (fss-911)September 23, 2022 Katana military mounts (fss-910)September 23, 2022 Ujinobu Wakazashi (fss-909)September 21, 2022 MINO DEN KATANA (fss-908)August 4, 2022 (IMAI) KANETSUGU (fss-907)August 4, 2022 TAKEDA MUNEYUKI (FSS-906)July 10, 2022 (MINO) DAIDO (fss-905)May 15, 2022 SEKI KANEKADO...
Katana military mounts (fss-910)

Katana military mounts (fss-910)

Katana military mounts (fss-910) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a katana that dates back to the 1600s or 1700s. It is mounted in military WWII fittings.  The sword over all is in good condition but could use restoration.  It is also signed but we feel that the signature is not correct for the workmanship on the sword.  The process in restoration of these types is that the first step is to remove the signature and make the sword unsigned. It can then be appraised properly and issued papers respectively in the future, or it can be appreciated as it is now with its history.  Here we find an antique Japanese sword that was mounted for the war effort.  It was customary for family Swords to be taken to the Arsenal and mounted during this time period for WWII. description here Mei: Izumi no kami kanesada (false signature) Date: Edo (1600’s-1700’s) Nagasa: 26-3/4 inches Sori: 13.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 32.9 mm Width at the yokote: 21.2 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.9 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: Itame Hamon: midare Boshi: Maru Condition: Needs polish Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold On Hold Asking price: $2,400.00 (shipping and insurance included) Email us if your interested in this item and remember to include the order number for this item: fss-633. info@nihontoantiques.com How To Order Information Click to Enlarge Image Subscribe for the Latest Updates!Join our mailing list to receive the latest News & Updates from Nihonto Antiques. SUBSCRIBE You have Successfully Subscribed! Your email address will be kept private & will only be used to send updates...
Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Bungo province in Kyushu produced such excellent sword-smiths as Yukihira in the Koto times. The Bungo Takada school was founded by Tomoyuki in the Nanbokucho period. Tomoyuki is considered to have been a superior sword-smith. With the passage of time it is generally felt that the quality and style declined and by the Muromachi period all of the works were pretty much the same. There are different schools of thought on the quality of Bungo works made in the Shinto period. Members of this school are also known as the Fuijwara Takada because they used Fujiwara as a family name in their signatures. An immediate response from many “sword experts” when Bungo works are mentioned is that they are not swords of great quality. Others feel that they are good swords. Perhaps the foundation of this difference of opinion is that if you look at the structure of Bungo Takada swords, you will see that they were made to satisfy practical rather than artistic needs. Indeed, at times they were sought out because of their cutting ability and sturdiness. Bungo and Fujiwara takeda both used many different styles of hamon due to the transference of knowledge from the many schools in close vicinity to them. It is said that the founder of the Bungo Takada school was Tomomitsu or Tomoyuki. Takada Swordsmiths in the Shinto age engraved the last name “Fujiwara”, and so they are called the Fujiwara Takada. One of the neighbors of the Takada school was the Hizen school. Hizen sword makers were controlled by Nabeshima daimyo...
KANESAKI WAKAZASHI (fss-715)

KANESAKI WAKAZASHI (fss-715)

KANESAKI WAKAZASHI (fss-715)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful wakazashi from the koto period attributed to Kanesaki of the tensho (1573-1592) periodwith unique workmanship of the mino den. This longish blade sports a picture perfect sugata with a longish kissaki. There is a horimono in the form of bohi which stops just above the yokote area. This Bohi finishes in the machi area and is rounded called maru-dome. Horimono such as this example are relatively rare in koto blades but accentuates the overall shape of this sword and adds to its period sugata. The tang is longish and ubu with one hole and finished as Ha agari kurijiri. The kissaki can almost be classified as O-kissaki, also there is small tempering at the boshi and is favoring notare-komi.The hada is a swirling patten of itame with Chikei and ji-nie can be found. The hamon is very unusual with a mountainess notare with gunome-midare, there are wisps of yubashiri forming into tobyaki in places running through the length of the blade above the hamon. These areas are cloud like floating above the hamon. The extreme health of this blade is something to be seen. This blade was mounted in shirasaya with a mekugi of ebony with a matching ebony wood habaki which shows the pride that the owner had in this sword. The unique characteristics along with the beautiful sugata of the blade papered to koto, Kanesaki mino den of the Tensho period. Mei: Mumei Date: Koto-tensho period (1573-1592) Nagasa: 21-1/2 inches Sori: 12.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 33.4 mm Width at the yokote: 25.0 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 8.1 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: Itame/mokume Hamon: Midare Gunome Boshi: Maru Condition: Good polish...
Echizen Kanenori (fss-713)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-713)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-713)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale   This stunning Echizen blade from the Shinto era comes in koshirai and is in a fine Japanese polish. The work on this sword is very elegant and exciting at the same time. In the hamon you can see tsunagashi and kinsuji with a well defined habuchi with some ko-nie to frost the top and in the valleys are much Nie to be seen.. The hada is well forged and in great shape for such beauty of a blade with some masame running here and there entwined with itame and mokume. Ji-nie appears. The style is that of shinogi-zukuri with double bohi carved. The tang is signed: Chikugo no Kami Fujiwara Kanenori Echizen-jû -on the reverse 2nd generation Echizen Kanenori (包則) From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmith, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino bldes, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and so a downright wave of migration of Mino/Seki swordsmiths can be seen, especially in the neighboring provinces of Owari and Echizen. As for Echizen, the province also gave a new home to many formerly Ômi-based Shimosaka smiths, thus we use classifications like “Echizen-Seki” (越前関) and “Echizen-Shimosaka” (越前下坂) to refer to these two different currents. The “trend-setters” of the Echizen-Seki group were first and foremost...