Edo Period Katana (fss-794)

Edo Period Katana (fss-794)

Edo Period Katana (fss-794) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This early sword comes in koshirai and is in a fine polish. The work on this sword is very elegant. The hamon is a saka-choji with profuse nie peppering the entire surface. In the hamon you can see tsunagashi and kinsuji with a well defined habuchi with much ko-nie to frost the top. The hada is well forged and beautiful in very good shape for an older sword with longish wavy masame running here and there entwined with itame and mokume. Ji-nie appears. The style is that of shinogi-zukuri. midare-komi appears in the boshi and the sword has an older feel to it. To say the sword is covered in ji-nie is an understatement. The nie litters the entire sword. The sword has a mino school feel to it but may also be from the owari school.  This blade should be submitted to shinsa to add more value and for an official appraisal of this sword. The mounts are of Dragonfly theme. According to legend, a dead soul can take the shape of a dragonfly, especially during Bon, the Buddhist Day of the Dead. The koshirae is a well made functional utility with a speckled lacquer of red. The menuki are of bees. The sageo as well as the tsuka-Ito are of a royal blue with aged same. The tsuba is of iron with dragonfly motif. The fuchi/kashira are also dragonfly themed. The habaki is a beautiful gold gilted and fluted in style as well as the seppa. Mei: Mumei Date: Late Edo (1700’s-1800’s) Nagasa: 27-3/8 inches Sori: 12.0 mm Width at...
Beautiful Daisho (fss-792)

Beautiful Daisho (fss-792)

Beautiful Daisho (fss-792) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale A True Samurai Daisho, These swords are mounted in an Oxen theme of very nice quality. The Motif is of oxen and are in pristine condition finished in shakudo, gold and copper with a fine nanako. The kodzuka is of oxen also with gold back finish. The saya are black with a brown sageo. The tsuba are nanban style but not your ordinary type. This daisho set are thick with a rounded rim that sings when tapped gently. There are dragons and a hidden Christian theme of crucifix’. The menuki appear to be Sakura of gold and shakudo finish. The ito is black and the same (rayskin have a beautiful patina). The habaki are an original matching silver foil with quite a patina finished in a rain storm pattern, just splendid. The Dai-to is ubu. A potential  beautiful blade if  polished and loaded with activity. Within the Sugu-ha, gunome can be seen, there is hotsure, sunagahi and kinsugi. The hada is a dense and beautiful itame and mokume mix with some masame. It is signed katsumitsu. The blades are from the koto period. The wakazashi an O-suriage piece, this sword has a hamon based in sugu-ha. The hada appears to be an itame nagare with ji-nie. Both swords are mounted in the true daisho style. These blades would be outstanding fully restored. A true original Daisho. The wearing of daishō was limited to the samurai class, and became a symbol or badge of their rank. Daishō may have became popular around the end of the Muromachi(1336 to 1573)as several early examples date from the late sixteenth century...
Ichimonji Hirotō, descendant of Tadayoshi (fss-791)

Ichimonji Hirotō, descendant of Tadayoshi (fss-791)

Ichimonji Hirotō, descendant of Tadayoshi (fss-791) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale HIROTŌ (広任), 1st gen., Kyōhō (享保, 1716-1736), Hizen – “Hizen Saga-jū Fujiwara Hirotō” (肥前佐賀住藤原広任), “Tadayoshi-son Ichimonji Hirotō” (忠吉孫一文字広任, “Ichimonji Hirotō, descendant of Tadayoshi”), “Bitchū no Jō Hirozumi” (備中掾広住), “Etchū no Jō Yoshizumi” (越中掾吉住), “Hizen-jū Etchū no Jō Hirozumi” (肥前住越中掾吉住), real name Hashimoto Yashichibei (橋本弥七兵衛), second son of the 1st gen. Yukihiro (行広), he died in the eleventh year of Kyōhō (1726), in later years he used the name Hirozumi (広住) and changed that name once more to Yoshizumi (吉住) but he used different honorary titles with each of these names, suguha, gunome-midare or notare in ko-nie-deki. HIROTŌ (広任), 2nd gen., Genbun (元文, 1736-1741), Hizen – “Hizen Ichimonji Fujiwara Hirotō” (肥前一文字藤原広任), “Hizen no Kuni Musashi no Daijō Hirotō” (肥前国武蔵大掾広任), real name Hashimoto Chū´emon (橋本忠右衛門), son of the 2nd gen. Hizen Kanehiro (兼広), he died in the third year of Kanpō. In the Tokugawa period, Saga was the capital of Hizen province and ruled over by the powerful Tozama Daimyo family, the Nabeshima. It is their heraldic crest or Mon, which is the crest appearing on Kenseikai Tenugui and Do. The Nabeshima clan were very powerful and rich, their wealth being based on several thriving industries, including the famous Nabeshima pottery which is much sought after today. However, arguably of more interest, was their highly successful manufacture and export of swords. These swords are of excellent quality in both artistic and practical terms. They are also well documented in Japanese books and because of their prolific production, there have been a reasonable number obtainable in the West...
Echizen Kanenori (fss-789)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-789)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-789) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This beautiful exquisitely made Tanto comes in a very nice polish. The hamon is extremely subtle with a Notare/gunome based in suguha temper. This blade was  made in the Echizen/shimosaka style from the shinto era. The hada is a masame mix with mokume and very finely done. The sword shows off the blades fine qualities in a very clear sashikomi polish. The blade is in HIRA-ZUKURI shape.  This stunning Echizen blade from the Shinto era comes in shirasaya with an ivory mekugi-ana ringlet and is in a fine Japanese polish. The work on this sword is very elegant and exciting at the same time. In the hamon you can see tsunagashi and kinsuji with a well defined habuchi with some ko-nie to frost the top and also in the valleys there is much Nie to be seen.. The hada is well forged and in great shape for such beauty of a blade with some masame running here and there entwined with itame and mokume. Ji-nie appears. The style is that of Hira-zukuri. A quality of hada called Echizen-gane which was indicative of this school can be found on this blade. The tang is signed: Echizen-no kuni-Shimosaka-Kanenori From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmiths, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino blades, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and...
EDO DAISHO (fss-787)

EDO DAISHO (fss-787)

EDO DAISHO (fss-787) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful Samurai Daisho, These swords are mounted in a spectacular suspension of abalone style Koshirae . The Motif is of scholars or men finished in iron with gold with a natural setting background. The Dai-to had papers but were unfortunately lost and will have to be papered at some future time. A beautiful blade in pristine polish and loaded with activity from the Shinto period. Within the gunome-midare hamon there is hotsure, sunagashi and kinsugi. The hada is a dense and beautiful itame and mokume mix with some masame and loaded with ji-nie. The Sho-to was attributed to kanesada of the shinto period. A mumei piece this sword has a hamon with O-gunome-midare throughout. The hada is an itame and mokume with ji-nie. Both swords are mounted in newly made saya to protect the polish. The koshirae has an ito of blue and the sageo is a teal in color. The Kodzuka blade is polished with a gunome-midare hamon. Much activity can be found within the hamon and hada of this ko-katana blade The kodzuka itself is a beautiful floral motif as well as the menuki. The tsubas are of a Jokushi style of a village scene within a mountain backdrop finished in iron. Both swords have matching gold washed habaki and seppa. The wearing of daishō was limited to the samurai class, and became a symbol or badge of their rank. Daishō may have became popular around the end of the Muromachi period (1336 to 1573)as several early examples date from the late sixteenth century.An edict in 1629 defining the duties of a samurai required the wearing of...