Mutsu Michitoki (fss-782)

Mutsu Michitoki (fss-782)

Mutsu Michitoki (fss-782) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful sword signed Mutsu Aizu Ju fujiwara Michitoki and dated also Tenpo 4 nen mi hatchi gatsu hi. They were a famous group of smiths that worked from first generation to 6th generation. This work was most likely made by the 3rd or 4th.generation. It is believed he was the sword smith from Mutsu Iwashiro. He was a student of Shoken Motooki , and emulated his master’s style. His jigane is well forged and  shows a milky appearance adding to its depth. This sword has a gunome hamon that is well balanced and has an abundance of hataraki.  A mixture of Nie and nioi is clearly visible and adds the hamon’s elegant pattern. The sword is in an older polish and its in good condition to show the fine details on this blade.  However a fresh polish would truly revitalize this sword powerful beauty.  Many more details would be strongly visible making for a more valuable and desirable sword. The mounts are of a good quality. There is a floral motif beautifully finished of leaves with vines. the tsuka has an wonderful black/brown leather tsukaito wrap and then lacquered over. The saya has been restored mant years ago and is in good condition and well made.  The lacquers in a rich design. On the fuchi a floral motif is used and the kashira is of horn.  This style is a more traditional tsuka and was often seen.  Mythological subjects and auspicious symbols were sometimes used as motifs for Japanese sword furniture. Floral motifs could stand alone as designs unto themselves, particularly if they had seasonal...
Shimada Sukemune (fss-781)

Shimada Sukemune (fss-781)

Shimada Sukemune (fss-781) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Shimada school in Suruga was along the Ōigawa river. The founder YOSHISUKE was active in the age of Kousho, the middle of 15th century and the other makers such as SUKEMUNE , HIROSUKE ,YOSHITSUNA MOTOSUKE appeared during the Muromachi period. The Suruga domain in those days had powerful regional warlords of the Imagawa , Takeda , Tokugawa who struggled with each other. The sword smiths of the Shimada school often had made a symbolic sign of swords or yaris to meet with the requirements from those powerful warlords. SUKEMUNE , His family name Gojo and given name Kyuzaemon has been said to be a younger brother of the founder YOSHISUKE. It is believed that he moved from the province of Bizen to Shimada town in Suruga. This tanto is attributed as the work of SUKEMUNE most likely during Tenbun-Eisho era (1532-69) who is highly renowned for the creation of the Osoraku-zukuri tanto which was owed by Takeda Shingen . It is unique with an extraordinary shape to show the impression that they were strongly influenced by the Soshu works of 14th C. Nanbokucho period. There are carvings of a ken with vajra and Gamabashi and Buddhist implements showing the close resemblance to Soshu works. The Fish belly shape of the nakago was popular and frequently seen in Soshu works 、Suruga-Shimada 、Soshu-Tsunahiro and the Bushu-Shitahara schools all shared this feature at times showing that frequent cultural exchange became very active along Tōkaidō (region). There is an example of a collaboration Tanto work both by MURAMASA of the Sengo...
Bizen Norimitsu (fss-775)

Bizen Norimitsu (fss-775)

Bizen Norimitsu (fss-775) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale “A beautiful and rare tanto by the Bizen smith Norimitsu” The First generation Norimitsu began in the Tei-ji era and continued through the late Muromachi period. During the Muramachi period, Morimitsu, Yasumitsu and Norimitsu were quite well known swordsmiths. At that time, Soshu style work is the rave and the Masahiro and Tsunahiro line with its exhuberant hitatsura was mimicked throughout all the schools.. This blade has an incredible jigane of itame and mokume blend with much masame and a very active and violent hitatsura hamon that jumps off this exquisite small tanto. Clear Utsuri can be seen. There is a long signature and date which also makes this a very precious piece as we can pinpoint the generation of this line of smiths. There is a very beautiful high grade Aikuchi style Koshirae that accompanies this blade. Norimitsu was a student of Nagamitsu and continued for several generations into late Muromachi period. This tanto is very unusual with soshu influenced hitatsura. The Jigane is marvelous with a beautiful Ji-hada of itame with mokume and masame, chikei can be seen. The Ubu  nakago has 2 holes is signed and dated and very precious and rare. TO NOTE: “This blade was submitted to Shinsa before polish and restoration.” The mounts: The koshirae is in the Aikuchi style. The mei of the fuchi reads: Hosono Sōzaemon Masanori + kaō (細野惣左衛門政守). These fitting are all matching and made by Hosono Sōzaemon Masanori. The fact that its all complete is exceptional. The saya is finished in a red and black Ishime style lacquer. The fittings are all matching of a village scene which consists of the full accoutrement of aikuchi style mountings of fuchi, kashira, kojiri, kurikata and kodzuka with blade....
Fujiwara Takada (fss-771)

Fujiwara Takada (fss-771)

Fujiwara Takeda (fss-771) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Bungo province in Kyushu produced such excellent sword-smiths as Yukihira in the Koto times. The Bungo Takada school was founded by Tomoyuki in the Nanbokucho period. Tomoyuki is considered to have been a superior sword-smith. With the passage of time it is generally felt that the quality and style declined and by the Muromachi period all of the works were pretty much the same. Members of this school are also known as Fuijwara Takada because they used Fujiwara as a family name in their signatures. There are different schools of thought on the quality of Bungo works made in the Shinto period. An immediate response from many “sword experts” when Bungo works are mentioned is that they are not swords of great quality. Others feel that they are good swords. Perhaps a foundation of this difference of opinion is that if you look at the structure of Bungo Takada swords, you will see that they were made to satisfy practical rather than artistic needs. Indeed, at times they were sought out because of their cutting ability and sturdiness. It is said that the founder of Bungo Takada school was Tomomitsu or Tomoyuki. Takada Swordsmiths in Shinto age engrave the last name “Fujiwara”, and so they are called also Fujiwara Takada. The neighbor of the Takada school was Hizen school. Hizen sword makers were controlled by Nabeshima daimyo and imported western steel. Takada school made swords that cut well. Early stage from late Muromachi to Kanbun era, Takada school swords were prized highly for cutting very well and...
Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Bungo province in Kyushu produced such excellent sword-smiths as Yukihira in the Koto times. The Bungo Takada school was founded by Tomoyuki in the Nanbokucho period. Tomoyuki is considered to have been a superior sword-smith. With the passage of time it is generally felt that the quality and style declined and by the Muromachi period all of the works were pretty much the same. There are different schools of thought on the quality of Bungo works made in the Shinto period. Members of this school are also known as the Fuijwara Takada because they used Fujiwara as a family name in their signatures. An immediate response from many “sword experts” when Bungo works are mentioned is that they are not swords of great quality. Others feel that they are good swords. Perhaps the foundation of this difference of opinion is that if you look at the structure of Bungo Takada swords, you will see that they were made to satisfy practical rather than artistic needs. Indeed, at times they were sought out because of their cutting ability and sturdiness. Bungo and Fujiwara takeda both used many different styles of hamon due to the transference of knowledge from the many schools in close vicinity to them. It is said that the founder of the Bungo Takada school was Tomomitsu or Tomoyuki. Takada Swordsmiths in the Shinto age engraved the last name “Fujiwara”, and so they are called the Fujiwara Takada. One of the neighbors of the Takada school was the Hizen school. Hizen sword makers were controlled by Nabeshima daimyo...