Echizen Kanenori (fss-789)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-789)

Echizen Kanenori (fss-789) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This beautiful exquisitely made Tanto comes in a very nice polish. The hamon is extremely subtle with a Notare/gunome based in suguha temper. This blade was  made in the Echizen/shimosaka style from the shinto era. The hada is a masame mix with mokume and very finely done. The sword shows off the blades fine qualities in a very clear sashikomi polish. The blade is in HIRA-ZUKURI shape.  This stunning Echizen blade from the Shinto era comes in shirasaya with an ivory mekugi-ana ringlet and is in a fine Japanese polish. The work on this sword is very elegant and exciting at the same time. In the hamon you can see tsunagashi and kinsuji with a well defined habuchi with some ko-nie to frost the top and also in the valleys there is much Nie to be seen.. The hada is well forged and in great shape for such beauty of a blade with some masame running here and there entwined with itame and mokume. Ji-nie appears. The style is that of Hira-zukuri. A quality of hada called Echizen-gane which was indicative of this school can be found on this blade. The tang is signed: Echizen-no kuni-Shimosaka-Kanenori From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmiths, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino blades, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and...
Chikuzen Yoshisuke (fss-786)

Chikuzen Yoshisuke (fss-786)

Chikuzen Yoshisuke (fss-786) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Chikuzen Nobukuni at the Edo period during the Kanbun era is continuation of the Muromachi period. Chikuzen-ju Yoshisada, Nobukuni Yoshisuke of which this sword is attributed to and Nobukuni-zaemon Yoshikane were active at same time. An affordable exquisite package for the connoisseur’s of collecting. This blade is fully polished and mounted with papers attributing it to CHIKUZEN NOBUKUNI YOSHISUKE. The sword is a beautiful saka gunome-midare just loaded with hataraki. There is ashi, sunagashi. a thick nioi-guchi, kinsuji. The hada is layed in ji-nie with much ara-nie peppering the hamon especially found in the valleys of the GUNOME. The hada is a true itame and mokume blend with masame. There is chikei and the boshi is finished in O-maru. The koshirae is a dazzling horse theme with fuchi, kashira and menuki of horses finished in shakudo and gold. The tsuba is a Mokko shape in iron with a picturesque setting of scholars under a tree signed and finished in gold and silver. The sageo and tsuka ito are a matching cobalt blue with a large nodule same(rayskin). The saya is beautiful and narrowly ribbed finished in black lacquer. Chikuzen Nobukuni History: Chikuzen Nobukuni is a long line extending from Koto times. The Sengoku labored all sword schools until the Momoyama of robust unification breathed new life into the arts and styles of all of Japan. The young masters coming from Ten-sho, such as Horikawa Kunihiro, traveling to Kyoto, would create a new world of strong new Momoyama styles. The “Shinto” sword-period grew directly from Hideyoshi’s Momoyama Unification....
HIGO MITSUYO (fss-784)

HIGO MITSUYO (fss-784)

HIGO MITSUYO (fss-784) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here A rare wakazashi by MITSUYO also pronounced MITSUSHIRO with the pseudonym of Hata , surname Ito and is said to have originated in Yamashiro. He stayed in Seki in Mino and then was adopted into the Echu-no-kami SADAYUKI in Owari where he broke off relations to become independent. The blade is signed on both sides ” HIGO NO KAMI HATA MITSUYO” and stating that this was made with Nanbam tetsu. Fortune made him work exclusively for a great swordsman Yagyu-renyasai TOSHIKANE then later learned from Tsushima-no-kami TSUNEMITSU by his mediation. He enjoyed an official district title of Higo-no-kami that was granted by the Imperial Court during the Kanbun era (1661-), he lived in Nishi-kaji-cho (now Nishiki-2-chome, Naka-award, Nagoya) then moved to Minami Monzen-machi. There is a well-known work by Hata MITSUYO, a wakizashi named Oni-no Houcho that was exclusively made for: Yagyu-renyu-TOSHIKANE and is his most distinguished work constructed with great pains and also the most famed Daisho-set of Kago-tsurube and Sasa-no-tsuyu which had been owed by Yagyu-renya TOSHIKANE during his lifetime. In the Tokugawa Art Museum collection, an odd shaped wakizashi work of Ito Higo no kami Hata Mitsuyo for Yagyu Toshinobu , tested to vivisect two bodies and a wakizashi of “Go YOSHIHIRO” a reproduction of the work of Tsushima-no-kami TSUNEMITSU both have been treasures of the Owari Tokugawa feudal clan and also the Owari Yagyu swordmans school. The number of extant works by the swordsmith MITSUYO is comparatively small because they were only made to order for the Owari yagyu school of swordsmanship. Copper finished Habaki collar, preserved in Shirasaya, a plain wood mounting. Good...
BUNGO NORIYUKI (fss-783)

BUNGO NORIYUKI (fss-783)

BUNGO NORIYUKI (fss-783) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautifully crafted sword with outstanding hada in a rare shape with longish kissaki, this blade is signed ” BUNGO JU FUJIWARA NORIYUKI”. This sword was previously from Japan mounted in a higher end shirasaya. The blade is a longish wakazashi which is ubu with one hole and signed. A signed Shinto wakazashi that has a hoso-suguha hamon with hataraki. A nice well worked mokume with much ji-nie.  A good blend of activity can be seen and appreciated within this blade in the Shinto fujiwara takada tradition. The Nakago is a very nice Iriyama-gata in shape. There is a silver foil habaki  This blade comes with a paper from the nthk authenticating the age and maker.  It is in an older polish with a very high end Japanese shirasaya accentuated with horn throughout with an ivory mekugi trim. The pictures do not do justice to this sword and is striking in hand.  It has some hataraki and ko-nie appear.  The hada is well forged with an appearance  of mokume with Ji-nie. The boshi is ko-maru and a bit longish . This wakazashi has an elegant shape and is very well balanced. It is very rare to find an U-no-kobu-zukuri of this length. This blade has striking qualities. The curvature is very nice and the blade overall is well balance and not heavy.  The shirasaya is outstanding. The age and patina of the honoki is beautiful and add to the overall appearance of this sword. A great family of Takada smiths whose blades were once sought after by many samurai. They were collectively known as the 3 “YUKI’S”. A family lead by the grandfather Sadayuki then to the...
Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770)

Takada Tadayuki (fss-770) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Bungo province in Kyushu produced such excellent sword-smiths as Yukihira in the Koto times. The Bungo Takada school was founded by Tomoyuki in the Nanbokucho period. Tomoyuki is considered to have been a superior sword-smith. With the passage of time it is generally felt that the quality and style declined and by the Muromachi period all of the works were pretty much the same. There are different schools of thought on the quality of Bungo works made in the Shinto period. Members of this school are also known as the Fuijwara Takada because they used Fujiwara as a family name in their signatures. An immediate response from many “sword experts” when Bungo works are mentioned is that they are not swords of great quality. Others feel that they are good swords. Perhaps the foundation of this difference of opinion is that if you look at the structure of Bungo Takada swords, you will see that they were made to satisfy practical rather than artistic needs. Indeed, at times they were sought out because of their cutting ability and sturdiness. Bungo and Fujiwara takeda both used many different styles of hamon due to the transference of knowledge from the many schools in close vicinity to them. It is said that the founder of the Bungo Takada school was Tomomitsu or Tomoyuki. Takada Swordsmiths in the Shinto age engraved the last name “Fujiwara”, and so they are called the Fujiwara Takada. One of the neighbors of the Takada school was the Hizen school. Hizen sword makers were controlled by Nabeshima daimyo...