Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)

Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)

Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A SWORD SIGNED AND PAPERED TO:  ” ECHIZEN JU HARIMA DAIJO FUJIWARA SHIGETAKA “ At the beginning of the Shinto period Echizen province (now Fukui pref.), also known as the Azuchi-Momoyama period in the 1570s, Native sword smiths from Seki, Mino provence such as KANETANE 兼種, KANENORI 兼則 had moved and MASANORI 正則 were invited from the capital of Yamashiro to Fukui, Echizen provence. The AOI crest was bestowed on YASUTSUGU 康継 from the Lord Tokugawa and 16 petals KIKU crests were bestowed from the Imperial Court on KUNIKIYO 国淸 of Kunihiro school. They strived to attain the skill for performance, strength and beauty of the martial spirit with the increasing demand from the Samurai. The smith SHIGETAKA 重高 with the official title of Harima-daijo 播磨大掾, had come from Iida, Shinshu provence then moved to Seki, Mino to become a disciple of KANENORI 兼則. SHIGETAKA 重高 had moved to Ichijōdani, Echizen to accept an invitation to work for the Asakura clan along with his master KANENORI 兼則. From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmiths, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino bldes, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and so a downright wave of migration of Mino/Seki swordsmiths can be seen, especially in the neighboring provinces of Owari and Echizen. As for Echizen, the province also gave a new home...
Noshu Ju Kanetoshi (fss-746)

Noshu Ju Kanetoshi (fss-746)

Noshu Ju Kanetoshi (fss-746)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a late war army officers sword from WWII. This sword is a hand forged blade. It has good hada that was well forged and a very active hamon that was water quenched in the tradition manner. This is a very good example of a sword made by the Rikugun Jumei sword smith Kanetoshi. Kanetoshi is listed as a Rikugun Jumei Tosho. Swords made from this group can have a star stamp on the blade as this one has. This blade comes in original mounts and is in mint condition. Signature: [Star Stamp] Nôshû-jû Kanetoshi (濃州住兼俊) [Seki Stamp] Shôwa jûkunen rokugatsu (昭和十九年六月, “June 1944”)   KANETOSHI (兼俊), Shōwa (昭和, 1926-1989), Gifu – “Kanetoshi” (兼俊), real name Murayama Kinokazu (村山喜之一), born August 3rd 1905, he worked as rikugun-jumei-tōshō and died February 23rd 1978, jōkō no retsu (Akihide), Second Seat at the 6th Shinsaku Nihontō Denrankai (新作日本刀展覧会, 1941) The hamon is an erratic blend of gorgeous choji midare with all sorts on inner activity to be found. The hada is mainly a tight well worked itame as seen in the pictures with misc. swirls of chikei and some O-hada.The blade is in a beautiful pristine polish and high grade shirasaya to protect the polish. The hamon is peppered with Nie as well as ji-nie. From the “Japanese Sword Guide” The presence of a STAR stamp on the nakago of a WW II era sword blade is an indicator of a blade made by swordsmiths of the Rikugun Jumei Tosho. To become Rikugun Jumei Tosho, a...
Yamato Masanori (fss-733)

Yamato Masanori (fss-733)

Yamato Masanori (fss-733)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale One of the true masters of Keicho Shinto. This smith can be found in most books and especially the ” Masters of Keicho Shinto by Markus Sesko “.. There is an outstanding gunome midare hamon. The hamon has an abundant amount of hataraki/activity and in a fresh polish will stand out beautifully. There are many tobyaki/yubashiri above the hamon. The hada is very clear and has a milky appearance and is well forged.  This is mounted in shirasaya with silver rain storm style habaki.   This sword is from an old collection and is papered to Den Masanori. Masanori was from the Yamada (山田) family and signed his name in early years with the characters (正法). He came originally from Miyatsu (宮津) in Tango province and was a late smith of the lineage of SanjōYoshinori (吉則). Via a stopover in Yamashiro, he moved to Fukui (福井) in Echizen province where he became a student of Kanenori (兼法). We know date signatures from the 13th year of Keichō(1608) to the fourth year of Keian (慶安, 1651). He had one successor who moved later to Edo. Although Masanori was mostly active somewhat later than Keichō, his early works are nevertheless interpreted in Keichō-shintōstyle. We can see a strong resemblance to Mino, or to be precise to Sue-Seki and Kanefusa (兼房) in his works, but certain blades remind of Hizen Tadahiro, Echizen Yasutsugu, or of the Horikawa school. A fine example of the older style blades this sword is polished and mounted in shirasaya “. A fresh polish would greatly enhance the value of the...
Chinese sword (nji 112)

Chinese sword (nji 112)

Chinese sword (nji 112)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale Click to Enlarge Image ” THIS IS ONE OF A SERIES OF SWORDS THAT WILL BE FEATURED IN THE ” FEATURED WEAPON SECTION OF KUNG FU TAI CHI MAGAZINE.” This sword is being offered for a short time only. As collectors of Chinese arms know most of these weapons from China were seized and or destroyed in the past and are becoming very hard to find. This sword in particular was acquired from a West coast dealer over 25 years ago. The blade is most likely from the mid 18 Century to the mid 19th Century, maybe older. It is very hard to date Chinese swords unless it still retains the original mountings. Most Chinese blades are not signed or dated and dating can be a task. Opinions can vary from the many experts. We were told that this blade is a true seven star sword blade and the brass that is left representing the stars were original and not added at a later date mainly due to the fact that each star is connected by the remnants of a wavy inlay which connects each star. This was usually only found on original seven star blades. The later brass additions on other blades were just usually round inlays of similar dimension and added at a later date. This is a monster to behold and wield. The blade is hand forged and the laminating patterns and tempered edge are can be seen throughout. The saya was made from rosewood we believe as well as the handle which is intricately hand carved with Dragons which...
Chinese sword (nji-111)

Chinese sword (nji-111)

Chinese sword (nji-111)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale ” THIS IS ONE OF A SERIES OF SWORDS THAT WILL BE FEATURED IN THE ” FEATURED WEAPON SECTION OF KUNG FU TAI CHI MAGAZINE.”   This sword is being offered for a short time only. As collectors of Chinese arms know most of these weapons from China were seized and or destroyed in the past and are becoming very hard to find. The blade is most likely from the mid 17 Century to the mid 19th Century, maybe older. It is very hard to date Chinese swords unless it still retains the original mountings. Most Chinese blades are not signed or dated and dating can be a task. Opinions can vary from the many experts.This is an excerpt from an article by Philip Tom of Mandarin Mansion who reproduced the handle of this sword. As you can see the blade closely resembles the sword second from the left. This particular sword was found many years ago in a consignment shop located very close to Boston’s Chinatown district. It was located in a very old building which has undergone Gentrification since. The building now has been converted to housing condominiums and the shop no longer exists. The blade was found in this saya with remnants of an old handle that was not restorable and stripped of its fittings. The shop owner at the time was told that this was most likely a 14 or 15 Century blade and was originally mounted with solid gold fittings and habaki that were stripped by the prior owner and refitted with this saya...