Soshu Masahiro (fss-763)

Soshu Masahiro (fss-763)

Soshu Masahiro (fss-763)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale We are pleased  to be able to offer an extremely rare Nambokucho era Soshu Masahiro. This blade is loaded with hataraki and horimono as can be seen in the pictures. One side has a carving of a Dragon wrapped around a ken with vajra or ” Shin no Kurikara “. The other side has a Bonji representing “Fudo Myoo ” with Gomabashi and Rendai or lotus blossums”. There is sunagashi, kinsuji and chikei. Ji-nie also abounds. There is a unique 3 dimensional quality to the steel as if looking through a pool of water at the hataraki, rarely seen and can be found on the best of Soshu blades. A great sword for the connoisseur of the early Soshu school just a couple of generations from Masamune. His influence can be greatly felt in this piece. This is a true Sunobi Tanto from the Nambokucho era, ubu with 3 holes. The sword is wide and beautiful to behold. A true Soshu masterpiece. It has Mitsumune and in an exquisite polish. This sword has very nice Nambokucho style horimono The koshirae is ensuite with a myriad of Dragonflies as the motif: “Dragonfly: According to legend, a passing soul can take the shape of a dragonfly, especially during Bon, the Buddhist Day of the Dead.” The Fuchi/Kashira are in soft metal with the eyes made of Radon or mother of pearl and appear to glow!. Truly spectacular. The kodzuka is of 2 dragonfly of different type and butterfly and very old. The kodzuka blade is hand forged with kanji. The tsuba is of Iron Sukashi style...
Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)

Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)

Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A SWORD SIGNED AND PAPERED TO:  ” ECHIZEN JU HARIMA DAIJO FUJIWARA SHIGETAKA “ At the beginning of the Shinto period Echizen province (now Fukui pref.), also known as the Azuchi-Momoyama period in the 1570s, Native sword smiths from Seki, Mino provence such as KANETANE 兼種, KANENORI 兼則 had moved and MASANORI 正則 were invited from the capital of Yamashiro to Fukui, Echizen provence. The AOI crest was bestowed on YASUTSUGU 康継 from the Lord Tokugawa and 16 petals KIKU crests were bestowed from the Imperial Court on KUNIKIYO 国淸 of Kunihiro school. They strived to attain the skill for performance, strength and beauty of the martial spirit with the increasing demand from the Samurai. The smith SHIGETAKA 重高 with the official title of Harima-daijo 播磨大掾, had come from Iida, Shinshu provence then moved to Seki, Mino to become a disciple of KANENORI 兼則. SHIGETAKA 重高 had moved to Ichijōdani, Echizen to accept an invitation to work for the Asakura clan along with his master KANENORI 兼則. From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmiths, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino bldes, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and so a downright wave of migration of Mino/Seki swordsmiths can be seen, especially in the neighboring provinces of Owari and Echizen. As for Echizen, the province also gave a new home...
Kai Mihara (fss-758)

Kai Mihara (fss-758)

Kai Mihara (fss-758)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a beautiful example of a Kai Mihara blade. The blade is Shobu-zukiri in shape with gomabashi horimono. The Hada is a beautifully rendered itame loaded with ji-nie and well worked throughout masame can also be seen. The hamon is a gunome-midare and very bright.a stout looking blade with incredible workmanship. While Osafune smiths were thriving in Bizen Province, there were a few prominent smith of the Aoe school in Bitchu Province in this period. ‘Meikan’ lists the smith names of Ietsugu, Kagetsugu, Hidetsugu, Moritsugu, Kunitsugu and Munetsugu as well as some smiths who were active after the Oei and Eikyo Eras. There is a school called ‘Mihara’ in Bingo Province of which the smiths were active from previous period. The school includes a considerable number of smiths, but there are few distinguished smiths and their workmanship does not show peculiarity so much. Also there is a term of ‘Kai-Mihara’ which it is used for the smiths of the school who were active in the end of the Muromachi Period, for instance ‘Mihara Ju Kai Masazane’. They tempered chu-sugu-ha with few hataraki, occasionally o-midare based on gunome and forge whitish jigane. There are extant works of Masaoku, Masazane and Masanao. The blade is with koshirae. There are shishi menuki and matching fuchi/kashira. the habaki is silver foiled with a cloud design. The saya is a black lacquer finish with a rust colored sageo and brown tsuka-ito. the tsuba is of iron with a floral leaf pattern design. All in all a great piece to study and...
Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)

Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)

Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A one handed katana from the Bizen Sukesada school. TheBlade is of uchi katana length with a hamon of Bizen midare. The nie deki hamon is very well done . Ashi and small kinsuji are seen along with fine mokume itame hada.The boshi is in midare komi and ichimai. Blade is gorgeous and in good condition, especially for its age. The tang is ubu 1 hole and signed with 2 character signature (Sukesada). During the twelfth century Uchigatana started to be used and by the Muromachi Period approximately 1336 to 1573 the uchigatana began to rival the tachi as the sword of choice by warriors. Unlike the tachi, the uchigatana was worn edge-up in the belt,  this and usually being slightly smaller than the tachi was the main difference between the tachi and the uchigatana.  Since it is worn differently, the engraved words on the sword are also opposite to the tachi, making the words still upright instead of upside-down like when one wears the tachi like an uchigatana. This sword became popular for several reasons, the uchigatana was more convenient to wear and did not get in the way of using a polearm as much as a tachi, also the frequency of battles fought on foot and the need for speed on the battlefield, were major reasons for the uchigatana being rapidly accepted and indicated that battlefield combat had grown in intensity. Since it was shorter, it could be used in more confined quarters, such as inside a building. Unlike the tachi, with which the acts of drawing and...
Noshu Ju Kanetoshi (fss-746)

Noshu Ju Kanetoshi (fss-746)

Noshu Ju Kanetoshi (fss-746)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a late war army officers sword from WWII. This sword is a hand forged blade. It has good hada that was well forged and a very active hamon that was water quenched in the tradition manner. This is a very good example of a sword made by the Rikugun Jumei sword smith Kanetoshi. Kanetoshi is listed as a Rikugun Jumei Tosho. Swords made from this group can have a star stamp on the blade as this one has. This blade comes in original mounts and is in mint condition. Signature: [Star Stamp] Nôshû-jû Kanetoshi (濃州住兼俊) [Seki Stamp] Shôwa jûkunen rokugatsu (昭和十九年六月, “June 1944”)   KANETOSHI (兼俊), Shōwa (昭和, 1926-1989), Gifu – “Kanetoshi” (兼俊), real name Murayama Kinokazu (村山喜之一), born August 3rd 1905, he worked as rikugun-jumei-tōshō and died February 23rd 1978, jōkō no retsu (Akihide), Second Seat at the 6th Shinsaku Nihontō Denrankai (新作日本刀展覧会, 1941) The hamon is an erratic blend of gorgeous choji midare with all sorts on inner activity to be found. The hada is mainly a tight well worked itame as seen in the pictures with misc. swirls of chikei and some O-hada.The blade is in a beautiful pristine polish and high grade shirasaya to protect the polish. The hamon is peppered with Nie as well as ji-nie. From the “Japanese Sword Guide” The presence of a STAR stamp on the nakago of a WW II era sword blade is an indicator of a blade made by swordsmiths of the Rikugun Jumei Tosho. To become Rikugun Jumei Tosho, a...