(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863)

(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863)

(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here: This is a wonderful example of a Bizen school sword that is signed and dated.  This is a legitimately signature.  A signed and dated blade is very interesting for a collector. It reads Bishu Osafune Sukesada, the date is very difficult to make out.  This sword should be submitted to shinsa someday in the future to add to its overall value.  We feel it dates from the1500’s or a bit later from the look and patina of the nakago and the blade itself.  The hamon is a wide suguba with good hataraki/activity. The hada is mokume. The sword has bohi, that are well carved.  This is a very well balanced sword and should also be considered for a quality iaido sword because of the Bohi carvings. The sword has original koshirai and the fuchi/kashira is a married set. The menuki are dragons and the tsuba is iron tsukashi with inlayed brass.  The mounts have some wear from age as the handle wrapping is old silk and the koiguchi has  minor damage that restorable.  The overall look and feel of this sword and its mounts is of a serious samurai sword not meant to be flashy. The history of Bizen swords During the latter half of the Heian  period (794–1185) the Minamoto clan and the Taira clan emerged as the two major warrior clans, with the tachi sword rapidly becoming their weapon of choice. More and more swordsmiths producing various tachi sword styles began to appear in the province of Bizen, which is also the location for quality iron...
(Echizen) Shimosaka (fss-862)

(Echizen) Shimosaka (fss-862)

Available Sold Special Sale This is a very good quality Echizen no Kuni Shimosaka tanto.  It comes with NBTHK Kanteisho attesting to the signature and quality.  This tanto is in polished condition. The hamon is notare midare and is well made.  The hada is mokume-hada mixed with masame-hada.  The tanto has bohi hori or carving and has gold foil two part habaki.  This sword was made during the shinto era (1600’s).   The Echizen seki school: Many swordsmiths moved to the Echizen province from Seki, in the Mino province. They were very active during the years 1658 through 1680.  Their work reflects the Shinto token tradition that was in fashion at the time as well as the Mino tradition. These smiths included Kanetane, Kanenori, Kanetaka, Tsuguhiro, Hirotaka, Yoshitane, and Kanenori.   Mei: Mumei Date: Edo (1600’s) Nagasa: 12-1/2 inches Sori: 1.5 mm Width at the ha-machi: 27.3 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.2 mm Construction: Hira-zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: mokume/masame Hamon: Midare Gunome Boshi: Maru Condition: Good polish Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold On Hold (shipping and insurance included) Email us if your interested in this item and remember to include the order number for this item: fss-862. NihontoAntiques@comcast.net How To Order Information Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image KANTEI-SHO (鑑定書) - APPRAISAL Wakizashi, signed: Echizen no Kuni Shimosaka (越前国下坂) ‒ “Shimosaka from Echizen province” nagasa ~ 31.6 cm According to the result of the shinsa committee of our society, we judge this work as authentic and rank it as Hozon Tōken. May 30, 2017[Foundation] Nihon Bijutsu Tōken Hozon Kyōkai, NBTHK (日本美術刀劍保存協會) Subscribe for the Latest Updates!Join...
(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-860)

(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-860)

(Hizen) Tadakuni (fss-860) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale TADAKUNI (Hizen) Tadakuni Fujishiro:TADAKUNI HARIMA NO DAIJÔ [KEIAN 1648 HIZEN] SHINTÔ JÔSAKU                 He is the son of Hizen Yoshiie, and his family name is Hashimoto.  In the beginning he inscribed the “MA” of Harima no Daijô as the “MA” of rub.  [TN: The bottom radical in the kanji is the radical of “TE”, or hand, rather than “ISHI” or stone. Look at the fourth and tenth items in the third phrase.]  In looking at his works from Kan’ei to Kanbun, the older ones say HARIMA NYÛDÔ TAITETSU, and works can be seen which have a good form, ji is ko-moku, hamon is chû-suguba or an exuberant midareba.  (Wazamono) Signatures:            HIZEN JÛ HARIMA NO DAIJÔ FUJIWARA TADAKUNI Item description:This is an excellent wakazashi made by a high level “jo-saku” smith.  This sword is in great condition and has a very well made hada in a ko-mokume styes with some course areas.  The hamon is extremely active and exuberant.  This is typical of Tadakuni.  The sword is in original mounts that show some wear but the fitting are in good condition and its complete. This wonderful old wakazashi has many things going for it and would be a fine sword to add to any collection. Mei: HARIMA NO DAIJÔ FUJIWARA TADAKUNI Date: (Edo) SHINTO 1600’s Nagasa: 21″ inches Sori: 12.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 28.7 mm Width at the yokote: 21.1 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.5 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: ko-mokume Hamon: Midare Gunome Boshi: Maru Condition: Polished Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold...
Ishidô Unju Korekazu (fss-850)

Ishidô Unju Korekazu (fss-850)

Ishidô Unju Korekazu (fss-850) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Ishido Korekazu was a nephew of Kato Chounsai Tsunatoshi, He was taught and learned from him and he succeeded the Ishido familyas the seventh generation, he passed away in 1894 at the age of 75.He made So-den bizen den style which is a combination of Bizen and Soshu den style.The First generation Korekazu was skilled in making Bizen den style with beautiful Utsuribut the7th generation Korekazu made swords in the Soshu style.This sword was made on a day in the second month Keiô three (1867), year of the hare.This sword is a combination of gunome/ choji midare within a notare blend hamon which is very rear bright and clear. The activity is amazuing and unusually clear with multitudes of hataraki such as sunagashi, kinsuji. Ko-nie and a wonderful frosting of nie can be seen on the habuchi. There are swirts of mokume as well as masame make up this eye catching hada.There is horimono on both sides odf the blade. A masterful carving of a cherry blossom tree as well as a poem in Buddhist calligraphy and Sanskrit bonji.The mounts keep in theme the advent of the cherry blossom. In Japan, cherry blossoms symbolize clouds due to their nature of blooming en masse, besides being an enduring metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life, an aspect of Japanese cultural tradition that is often associated with Buddhist influence,] and which is embodied in the concept mono no aware. The association of the cherry blossom with mono no aware dates back to 18th-century scholar Motoori Norinaga The transience of the...
Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849)

Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849)

Yamashiro Kunikiyo Daisho (849) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Yamashiro kami Fujiwara Kunikiyo is a son of Shimada Sukemune.born at Shinshu Matsumoto province.After that he studied under Horikawa Kunihiro.He changed his name to Kunikiyo and after Kanei 4th, he got the title of the Yamashiro Daijo.and after that he changed it to Yamashiro no Kami.After his great master Kunihiro passed away, he moved to Matsumoto Shinsyu province and from thereHe moved to Echizen province and followed Daimyo Matsudaira who was ordered to move Echizenby Tokugawa Shogun. This era is his most skilled years.He passed away Keian 2nd at 60 years of age..Kunikiyo is famous for his style of sugu-ha and hada akin to Hizen Tadahiro and can be mistaken for the best of Hizen Tadahiro work. The hada can appear to be veryb similar to honoku hada made dfamous by the Hizen school but with a Horikawa Kunihiro flare. This is an exceptional Daisho that high end collectors look for and cherish when found. Dr. Kanzan Sato, former director of the NBTHK (the sword museum ofJapan) writes in his book The Japanese Sword  that Yamashiro no Kami Kunikiyo was the most famous swordsmith in the Shinto (Edoperiod) that was granted permission to stamp the 16-petal kiku-mon imperial family chrysanthemum on the nakago of his swords. Kunikiyo first left his hometown of Suruga province to Kyoto and became a star student of grandmaster swordsmith Horikawa Kunihiro. He received the Horikawa kanji character for Kuni whereupon he became Kunikiyo. He left Kyoto in 1614 after his master’s death. Kunikiyo was retained by the powerful daimyo (lord) MatsudairaTadamasa and moved to Fukui to join him in 1624....