KODAI KANEMOTO (fss-868)

KODAI KANEMOTO (fss-868)

  KODAI KANEMOTO (fss-868) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful Kanemoto wakizashi mumei of a later generation. The 1st generation started the unique hamon  pattern commonly called  sanbonsugi. It is said to resemble a row of three cryptomeria (cypress) treetops.= commonly referred to AS “THE 3 Cedars”. Cypress trees are indigenous to Japan and used in many Japanese gardens. This sword is from Mino province where it was forged approximately 350-400 years ago. The flamboyant hamon can be traced back to Magoroku Kanemoto in the early parts of the 16th century and many following generations continued this tradition for hundreds of years afterwards. This ubu wakazashi has an approximately 13.35″ cutting edge. A KO-Maru as well as sugu style hamon appears in the boshi .The hamon on this particular blade is Sanbonsuji, with a mix of irregular gunome midare. Activity can be found within. The hada is a course itame with mokume that literally jumps off the blade. A very interesting and exciting sword to view. This outstanding sword is fully polished and a treat for the collector. This sword has a very small blemish that is slightly visible in the blowup photos. It takes nothing away from this blade.  Also note that it can be completely repaired if desired someday exclusively by Nihonto Antiques/Moses Becerra.  We are the only place in all of the US currently doing repairs like this. We don’t recommend though, Because it’s such a small blemish thats hardly visible. The sword comes mounted in an interesting koshirae of Dragons. The saya is in red lacquer with a konoka like design made to resemble rice bran. The Fuchi /kashira are of dragons with small floral like mons in many small cartouche. The menuki...
SHOWA AKIYUKI (fss-867)

SHOWA AKIYUKI (fss-867)

SHOWA AKIYUKI (fss-867) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale AKIYUKI (昭行), Shōwa (昭和, 1926-1989), Gunma – “Akiyuki” (昭行), real name KuriharaWashio (栗原鷲雄), he worked as a rikugun-jumei-tōshō This gendai-to sword is a wonderful katana. The hada is A TIGHT IOTAME/MOKUME MIX. The hamon is based in sugu-ha made up of a gunome midare with a tight nioi-gucchi. The boshi is also ko-maru of gunome midare. This sword is wide healthy blade a bit on the larger side.  A beautiful sword for mounting and training.  The term “gendai or gendaito”  is used by collectors to refer to traditionally made blades; those which have folded steel and are water tempered. The Japanese require that for a sword to be “gendaito” it must be made of tamehagane or oroshigane even though it is impossible to tell what a sword is made from after the sword is finished and polished. Swords made of forge folded commercial mill steel look the same as those made of tamehagane after they are polished although some collectors feel that swords made of tamehagane are more likely to have active hamon and more prominent hada than those made of folded mill steel. Gendaito Swords Explained The term “gendaito” also refers to Japanese swords produced during 1876 to 1945. Japanese bladesmiths have produced swords for centuries, with some of the region’s first swords dating back to around 300 to 500 A.D. There were still swords in Japan before this era, though they were believed to have come from China. It wasn’t until 300 to 500 A.D. when Japan began making its own swords. Modern swords produced in Japan from 1876 to 1945...
OWARI NOBUTAKA (fss-866)

OWARI NOBUTAKA (fss-866)

OWARI NOBUTAKA (fss-866) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Original Nobutaka line of smiths starts with the 1st or Shodai who received the title of Hoki no Kami around 1581. A title which was carried by a total of five generations of smiths with this same name. The Shodai Nobutaka worked during the dawn of the Shinto period from warring states period  through the Keicho era and into the the early 16th century under the Tokugawa Shogunate. He resided in Owari in 1610. He was the approx.50 years of age at this time. He was originally in Mino provence. Tokugawa Yoshinao was placed as the ruler of Owari, and head of the Owari Tokugawa branch at this time so Nobutaka knew that this area would be in need of a smith base. The demand for Nobutaka smiths swords arose as the Owari Tokugawa placed them under direct employment, and they made swords for the Tokugawa Kenjutsu instructor, Yagyu Renyasai Shigekane. For this reason, most Nobutaka works are gassaku (jointly made work) between the generations as they came of age and then passed the school on to the next. The style of the Nobutaka smiths are referred to as “Owari Seki” due  to their Mino origins and characteristics. Swords by the second and third generation have a distinct shape and are referred to as “Kanbun Shinto”. The Kanbun era was relatively short lived and the shape of the swords  were with a shallow sori and a prevalent taper their entire length. This was an effort to capitulate on the style of swordsmanship of the times as well as the...
Koto Mihara (fss-865)

Koto Mihara (fss-865)

Koto Mihara (fss-865)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A well made koto blade of the Mihara school. This blade is believed to be from the Tenmon era of thev 16thcentury. The hada is a beautiful Itame nagare with mokume and much ji-nie. Utsuri appears on the ji. The hamon is a rich wavy Sugu-ha with much hataraki for your viewing pleasure. The undulating hamon is sprinkled with nie the entire length of the blade and there are mountainous wisps of sunagashi throughout. The boshi is ko-maru. The Mihara School started in Bingo Province around the Shochu era (1324 - 1326), according to Yamanaka,  “Descendants of the late Mihara School and of the Goami School made a few blades.” Bingo is on the Sanyodo Highway, on the south side of the western portion of Honshu, the main island of Japan. It faces the inland sea, beside Bitchu province. Mihara school had been prospered from late Kamakura to late Muromachi period in Bingo province present Okayama prefecture. The representative swordsmiths were Masaie and Masahiro. Especially the works of last Kamakura period to Namboku-cho period are called Ko-Mihara, and are distinguished from the later period.Rising above the times, the school had been influenced by the Yamato School. There had been many shoen; manors in medieval Japan in Bingo province ruled by the shrines and temples of Yamato province. As the features of Mihara school, elegant suguha-hamon with slight midare-ba and smooth Itame-hada. The sword comes mounted in beautiful koshirae with stylized fuchi/kashira .  The menuki are turtles and very nice quality. Meanings derived from a turtle/tortoise...
Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864)

Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864)

Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here: This sword has been fully restored and is in a fresh sashikomi polish.  The workmanship in this katana is excellent and the hamon is very active and beutiful.  The sword has no flaws and is in interesting mounts that are in a waves and crabs motif.  The tsukamaki silk is brown and the saya has stone texture.  The sword is not signed, however the NTHK attribution is to 1st Generation Katsukuni.   KATSUKUNI (勝国), 1st gen., Kanbun (寛文, 1661-1673), Kaga – “Kashū-jū Fujiwara Ieshige saku” (加州住藤原家重作), “Kashū-jū Iyo no Daijō Darani Tachibana Katsukuni” (加州住伊予大掾陀羅尼橘勝国), “Iyo no Daijō Tachibana Katsukuni saku” (伊予大橘勝国作), second son of the 1st gen. Ieshige (家重), real name Matsuto Zenzaburō (松戸善三郎), in Kanbun one (寛文, 1661), he received through the agency of his employer, the Maeda family (前田), from chancellor Yotsuji Yoshiie (四辻吉家) the honorary title Iyo no Daijō (伊予大掾), the clan name Fujiwara used by him so far was changed with this to Tachibana (橘) and the smith name to Katsukuni (勝国), with this he was the 1st gen. Darani Katsukuni but counted himself also as 17th gen. Rai Kuniyoshi (来国吉), he died in the twelfth year of Kanbun (寛文, 1672), itame mixed with masame and a Kanemoto-like sanbonsugi, the interpretations of Ieshige/Katsukuni are insofar different from that of Kanemoto as that they show nie in the valleys between the sanbonsugi elements, kata-sujikai yasurime, jō-saku Mei: Mumei Date: Edo (1600’s-1700’s) Nagasa: 25-1/2 inches Sori: 15.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 31.5 mm Width at the yokote: 21.3 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.5 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu...