Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)

Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)

Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A one handed katana from the Bizen Sukesada school. TheBlade is of uchi katana length with a hamon of Bizen midare. The nie deki hamon is very well done . Ashi and small kinsuji are seen along with fine mokume itame hada.The boshi is in midare komi and ichimai. Blade is gorgeous and in good condition, especially for its age. The tang is ubu 1 hole and signed with 2 character signature (Sukesada). During the twelfth century Uchigatana started to be used and by the Muromachi Period approximately 1336 to 1573 the uchigatana began to rival the tachi as the sword of choice by warriors. Unlike the tachi, the uchigatana was worn edge-up in the belt,  this and usually being slightly smaller than the tachi was the main difference between the tachi and the uchigatana.  Since it is worn differently, the engraved words on the sword are also opposite to the tachi, making the words still upright instead of upside-down like when one wears the tachi like an uchigatana. This sword became popular for several reasons, the uchigatana was more convenient to wear and did not get in the way of using a polearm as much as a tachi, also the frequency of battles fought on foot and the need for speed on the battlefield, were major reasons for the uchigatana being rapidly accepted and indicated that battlefield combat had grown in intensity. Since it was shorter, it could be used in more confined quarters, such as inside a building. Unlike the tachi, with which the acts of drawing and...
Enomoto Sadahito (fss-756)

Enomoto Sadahito (fss-756)

Enomoto Sadahito (fss-756)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale FROM THE BOOK ” THE NEW GENERATION OF JAPANESE SWORDSMITHS ” Enomoto Sadahito Craft:  Tosho (swordsmith) Born: 1954 Address:  Mishima City, Shizuoka Prefecture Enomoto Sadahito is the son of Enomoto Sadayoshi.  He began training under his father while an elementary student, and became a licensed smith in 1977.  He specializes in the Soshu Den, making swords in the tradition of Masamune and Sadamune.  He also works in the Gassan tradition, making the trademark ayasugi hada. He uses tamahagane as well as old steel and oroshigane.  He makes swords using the kobuse or makuri construction.  True to the Soshu Den, his hamon is a midare with profuse nie, sunagashi, kinsuji, and other hataraki. Sadahito was invited to demonstrate his craft in 1998 at the University of Wisconsin Art Facultyˆ‚s Traditional Japanese Metalwork Seminar.  He is currently the President of the Tokai Branch of the National Association of Swordmakers. Sadahito is a regular entrant in the yearly sword making contests; he has taken the Doryoku Sho, or Effort Award, three times.  He is an up and coming  smith with great potential; surely his future is a bright one.   This Shinsakuto is a beautiful traditionally made sword. With almost a 29″ Nagasa and custom mountings this is a sword to admire. This blade was created to use for training and also for cutting in the traditional Martial Arts as well as for a collector of Shinsakuto blades. A gunome midare hamon with loaded with nie , sunagashi, kinsuji and much more adds to the aesthetic quality of the blade. There is boho which also adds to the balance...
Soshu Hirotsugu (fss-755)

Soshu Hirotsugu (fss-755)

Soshu HiroTsugu (fss-755)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This blade is spectacular in its size and girth. At just over 31″ it is a site to behold and view. Koto era swords of this length are very uncommon and desirable.  The hamon represents the best of this style by this smith based in a gunome midare with choji. It is laced with sunagashi, kinsuji and nie. The hada has a depth seldom seen on swords of this era. There is a deep, rich looking hada. The blade is loaded with chikei, ji-nie all on an elegantly woven pattern of Masame, itame and mokume grain pattern blending for the perfect backdrop of this gorgeous hamon. The pictures cannot show the complete beauty of this steel and must be appreciated in hand. The polish is a spectacular sashikomi style which gives a crystal clear view of all the swords unique attributes. The boshi is ko-maru with hakikake. The blade is O-suriage but appears ubu with 2 mekugi-ana. It is beautifully carved with an exceptional horimon of dragon on sword and sohi with bonji on other side. The koshirae is a spectacular accompaniment to the sword. The fittings of samurai in battle are also in a spectacular pristine condition. The Tsuka-ito and Sageo are a rich blue and the lacquer is finished in a stone texture of brown highlights which perfectly accompanies the horimono of the blade. There is a stylized mokko-gata and arabesque tsuba in iron with a deep motif engraved Cloud design. There are Buddhist figures sitting front to back in meditative postures for menuki. The Same has a beautifully aged patina.This beautiful koshirae is adorned with matching royal blue sageo and tsuka...
Sado no Motoyoshi (fss-754)

Sado no Motoyoshi (fss-754)

Sado no Motoyoshi (fss-754)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale KUNITOMI (国富), Genroku (元禄, 1688-1704), Nagato – “Minamoto Kunitomi Nagato Hagi-jū” (源国富長門萩住), “Sado no Daijō Fujiwara Kunitomi” (佐渡大掾藤原国富), “Sado no Kami Kunitomi Motoyoshi saku” (佐渡守国富元嘉作), “Sado no Kami Fujiwara Kunitomi” (佐渡守藤原国富), he lived in Hagi (萩) and signed later with Motoyoshi (元嘉), the name Motoyoshi is listed in some sources with the characters (元喜), mostly Tegai-style suguha mixed with ko-midare, nijūba and kuichigaiba, he also worked in Edo, Ōshū, and in Matsue (松江) in Izumo province, chū-saku. This katana is a very sound and healthy blade and appears to be an older shinto sword..  The blade is loaded with exciting activity and is of high quality.  The hamon is bright and shows many hataraki/activity.  The hada is milky looking and  is forged well with much ji-nie and utsuri seems to appear.  The overall feel of this blade is one of a well balanced beautiful katana that is very sharp. The hamon is frosted with nie and the hada is a tighly well forged mokume with itame. There is gunome-midare that is very beautifull which is full of sunagashi and other hataraki. Tobyaki can be seen floating above the hamon. The boshi is Kaen loaded with hakikake. Ji-nie and Ara-nie pepper this sword completely..The mounts are very well made. The koshirae is not fancy but are more of a true samurai style and very utalitarian.  They are plush looking without a flashy appearance. The koshirae are a mix of a wonderful brown lacquer work and matching Ito and Sageo. There is a small menuki depicting a horse in a setting. A silver foiled habaki also...
Hokke Katana (fss-753)

Hokke Katana (fss-753)

Hokke Katana (fss-753)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This wonderful katana has great workmanship and a beautiful Hoso-suguha hamon wonderfully controlled. The blade is ubu with one hole. There is bohi which greatly adds to the blades overall shape or appearance. A spectacular collection of activity with many chikei and more. Ji-nie and utsuri can be seen.   It is in a very beautiful polish with an outstanding set of koshirae.  The hamon is very nicely done with a modest nioi-guchi frosted with nie.  It has some hataraki and ji-nie throughout.  The hada is nicely forged with a slick looking itame some small areas of wavy masame.  The boshi is a ko-maru finish. This early katana has a fine sugata. The mounts are in very nice condition and add to the overall value of this sword.  The fittings are sound and have a deep traditional look and display very well.  Overall this is a fine Japanese katana. The mounts are of very good quality from tsuka to saya and are completely adorned in tiger motif.. The theme of the menuki beautifully finish the tsuka and saya with black tsukaito wrap and sageo. The saya is black lacquer with ishime texture. The tiger menuki motif was often used as a theme for Asian art. Mythological subjects and auspicious symbols were sometimes used as motifs for Japanese sword furniture. Motifs could stand alone as designs unto themselves, particularly if they had seasonal or symbolic associations, but they were also used as decorative patterns surrounding or backing more pictorial motifs such as this. The habaki is finished in gold wash. The tsuba is iron and also of tiger motif with bamboo and gold inlay.. This is a wonderful old sword for a collector who...