Ko-Uda Katana (fss-877)

Ko-Uda Katana (fss-877)

Ko-Uda Katana (fss-877) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This sword in particular has a beautiful sugu-ha midare hamon peppered in nie with a boshi finished in hakikake. The hada is a finely worked itame and mokume covered in ji-nie. The blade is O-suriage with one hole. The koshirae is elegant and fully restored also. The Fuchi Kashira and Tsuba are all horse themed and menuki of a person in shakudo and gold. The tsuka ito is a spectacular purple in color with black Sageo on a black lacquered saya. There is a fluted tsuba lobed and the seppa and shitodome are gilded in gold to finish this attractive package for this wonderful school of smiths. The Ko-Uda school: The beginnings of the Ko-Uda school was with Nyudo kunimitsu and also his many students like Kunifusa, Kunimune and Kunitsaugu.Generally the old Ko-Uda school made a suguha hamon with soshu den finishes.This sword is suguha midare with but soshu den influence can be seen with the added kinsuji work and profuse Chikei.  Ko-Uda has been a thriving school from the Kamakura period to the Nanbokucho period (1185-1391)and has continued to be felt during the early Muromachi period. The Uda school moved from Yamato province, Uda to Ecchu province.Nyudo Kunimitsu was the founder of the Uda schoool. The founder of the Uda School  is considered to have been Kunimitsu .  He was originally from the Uda  district of Yamato Province.  He worked around the Bunpo Era or 1317 at the end of the Kamakura Era.  All of the succeeding smiths of this school used the kanji character “Kuni”  in...
Koto Katana (fss-876)

Koto Katana (fss-876)

Koto Katana (fss-876) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale An outstanding katana which is from the koto period. This sword reminds one of a Bizen katana.  This blade has the typical characteristics of blades made in the koto era. It also has alongish Kissaki and attractive Sori, iand is  O-Suriage. The activities in the  Ha are very beautiful with ji-nie . The hamon is an attractive large  gunome-ish choji midare in a notarish pattern.. There is ashi and many hataraki to be found. The hada is covered in ji-nie and is an itame mixed with beautiful mokume swirls.  The hada has a dense itame and mokume with and a whitish jigane and the hamon is a  gunome/choji midare. Ko-nie layers the entire hamon blanketing the nioi-guchi.  This katana is very sound and healthy. The blade is wide and has a wonderful curvature.   The koshirae is clean and fundamental with menuki of floral motif . The fuchi kashira is a picturesque depiction of a scholars in gold surrounded by trees and fauna in gold inlay on iron. A black lacquered saya . The Tsuba is of Sukashi style of pine trees. The blade is in polish. The sageo is gold and the tsuka-ito is gold to match. A wonderful package to a splendid blade. We recommend submitting this sword for Shinsa.  Mei: Mumei Date: Koto (1400’s-1500’s) Nagasa: 26-1/2 inches Sori: 12.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 27.3 mm Width at the yokote: 20.3 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.7 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Suriage Kitae: Itame Hamon: Midare Gunome Boshi: Maru Condition: Good polish Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold On Hold Asking...
Nagashige Katana (fss-875)

Nagashige Katana (fss-875)

Nagashige Katana (fss-875) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This to is a beautiful edo period Katana.  The sword is reminiscent of the beautiful work of this era. The blade is a longish piece, suriage, with a fine hada and a wavy notare-ish gunome midare hamon. At almost 27” this blade is a wonderful piece. The hada is a fine Mokume and itame covered in ji-nie . There is a longish ko-maru kissaki . There is ji-nie all over. The sublime execution of the the ko-itame reminds one of the twinkling of stars as the ji-nie highlights the intricacies of the workmanship of the steel. The hamon is made up of a gunome-midare base which looks spectacular in this polish which is pristine. A fantastic sword with much to enjoy and appreciate. The blade is suriage but still contains most of the mei with Kiku Ichi.  Fujishiro has this to say: NAGASHIGE SESSHÛ NO KAMI SHODAI [JÔÔ 1652 RIKUZEN] SHINTÔ CHÛJÔSAKU                 He is the third generation of Sendai Nagatoshi, is called Tashiro Shigetarô, and he received his title during the Jôô era.  (Wazamono) Signature:              SESSHÛ NO KAMI FUJIWARA NAGASHIGE, and he also inscribed the KIKU MON. Page 186 NAGASHIGE SESSHÛ NO KAMI NIDAI [HÔREKI 1751 RIKUZEN] SHINTÔ CHÛJÔSAKU                 He is in the Nagatoshi Mon, his initial signature was KIYOTOSHI, and he became the nidai Nagashige.  [TN: It was a long time from 1652 to 1751.  Perhaps nidai does not necessarily mean son or immediate succession.]  He also signed later as NAGASHIGE, [TN: Different kanji for “SHIGE”], and there were also times when he inscribed the KIKU MON. Signatures:            ÔSHÛ...
IKKANSAI YOSHIHIRO (FSS-872)

IKKANSAI YOSHIHIRO (FSS-872)

Ikkansai Yoshihiro (fss-872) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This blade is spectacular, it is a site to behold and view. We believe this to be an utsushi of a Koto era sword by Norishige which are very uncommon and desirable.  The hamon represents the best of this style by this smith based in a gunome midare with choji. It is laced with sunagashi, kinsuji and nie. The hada has a depth seldom seen on swords of this era. This is a deep, rich looking hada of the Mitsukawa style in which he was trained and can be seen in the juyo level token of Norishige also. The blade is loaded with chikei, ji-nie all on an elegantly woven pattern of a swirling masame, itame and mokume grain  called Mistukawa blending for the perfect backdrop of this gorgeous hamon. The pictures cannot show the complete beauty of this steel and must be appreciated in hand. The polish is a spectacular sashikomi style which gives a crystal clear view of all the swords unique attributes. The boshi is ko-maru with hakikake and gunome-midare. The blade is O-suriage but may have been done purposely to emulate the great koto blades of Norishige. It is beautifully carved with an exceptional horimono of a dragon around a ken called “ So No Kurikawa “ with gomabashi and bonji also.  Also, please note the kirikomi 切り込み (cutting mark) or battle scars.  This is a very interesting aspect on this sword. This sword is accompanied by an outstanding beautiful koshirae. The tsuka-ito and matching sageo are finished in a cobalt blue. The Same(rayskin) is lacquered in black. The...
Bizen Katana (fss-871)

Bizen Katana (fss-871)

Bizen Katana (fss-871) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a koto Bizen katana.  It looks like its from the  muromachi era. The quality of this sword is good and has no flaws. This blade has been shortened and has bohi that are original to the sword. The hamon is a mixture of gunome/choji midare with an itame/mokume mix for hada that is well forged. The koshirai is black lacquered with Same(rayskin) at the top of the saya. The tsuba is sukashi style. The menuki are round and the tsuki-ito is gold with a sageo to match.  The habaki is gold foiled and very good quality. It is in an older polish with minor scuffing.  It would be a great candidate for shinsa someday.  Its mounted solidly and can even be a good sword for iaido training. Bizen Province, now the southwest area of Okayama, was once known as the sword kingdom.Possessing talented swordsmiths and nearby high-quality raw materials accessible by water transportation, Bizen produced the most swords in Japan during the Heian Period (794-1185), beating Yamashiro, Yamato, Sagami and Minohe, the other popular sword-making areas. In the Muromachi period, Harima, Mimasaka and Bizen province had prospered under the protection of the Akamatsu family. Above all, Bizen province has turned out a great many of talented swordsmiths. Supplying the demand of the Age of Provincial Wars in Japan, a large number of swords were made there in the late Muromachi period. Sukesada has become a synonym for the Osafune School though the founder was Mitsutada. It is regrettable that a deluge devastated the School in Osafune...