Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864)

Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864)

Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here: This sword has been fully restored and is in a fresh sashikomi polish.  The workmanship in this katana is excellent and the hamon is very active and beutiful.  The sword has no flaws and is in interesting mounts that are in a waves and crabs motif.  The tsukamaki silk is brown and the saya has stone texture.  The sword is not signed, however the NTHK attribution is to 1st Generation Katsukuni.   KATSUKUNI (勝国), 1st gen., Kanbun (寛文, 1661-1673), Kaga – “Kashū-jū Fujiwara Ieshige saku” (加州住藤原家重作), “Kashū-jū Iyo no Daijō Darani Tachibana Katsukuni” (加州住伊予大掾陀羅尼橘勝国), “Iyo no Daijō Tachibana Katsukuni saku” (伊予大橘勝国作), second son of the 1st gen. Ieshige (家重), real name Matsuto Zenzaburō (松戸善三郎), in Kanbun one (寛文, 1661), he received through the agency of his employer, the Maeda family (前田), from chancellor Yotsuji Yoshiie (四辻吉家) the honorary title Iyo no Daijō (伊予大掾), the clan name Fujiwara used by him so far was changed with this to Tachibana (橘) and the smith name to Katsukuni (勝国), with this he was the 1st gen. Darani Katsukuni but counted himself also as 17th gen. Rai Kuniyoshi (来国吉), he died in the twelfth year of Kanbun (寛文, 1672), itame mixed with masame and a Kanemoto-like sanbonsugi, the interpretations of Ieshige/Katsukuni are insofar different from that of Kanemoto as that they show nie in the valleys between the sanbonsugi elements, kata-sujikai yasurime, jō-saku Mei: Mumei Date: Edo (1600’s-1700’s) Nagasa: 25-1/2 inches Sori: 15.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 31.5 mm Width at the yokote: 21.3 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.5 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu...
(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863)

(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863)

(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here: This is a wonderful example of a Bizen school sword that is signed and dated.  This is a legitimately signature.  A signed and dated blade is very interesting for a collector. It reads Bishu Osafune Sukesada, the date is very difficult to make out.  This sword should be submitted to shinsa someday in the future to add to its overall value.  We feel it dates from the1500’s or a bit later from the look and patina of the nakago and the blade itself.  The hamon is a wide suguba with good hataraki/activity. The hada is mokume. The sword has bohi, that are well carved.  This is a very well balanced sword and should also be considered for a quality iaido sword because of the Bohi carvings. The sword has original koshirai and the fuchi/kashira is a married set. The menuki are dragons and the tsuba is iron tsukashi with inlayed brass.  The mounts have some wear from age as the handle wrapping is old silk and the koiguchi has  minor damage that restorable.  The overall look and feel of this sword and its mounts is of a serious samurai sword not meant to be flashy. The history of Bizen swords During the latter half of the Heian  period (794–1185) the Minamoto clan and the Taira clan emerged as the two major warrior clans, with the tachi sword rapidly becoming their weapon of choice. More and more swordsmiths producing various tachi sword styles began to appear in the province of Bizen, which is also the location for quality iron...
Edo Period Katana (fss-856)

Edo Period Katana (fss-856)

Edo Period Katana (fss-856) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The work on this sword is very elegant. The hamon is a saka-choji with profuse nie peppering the entire surface. In the hamon you can see tsunagashi and kinsuji with a well defined habuchi with much ko-nie to frost the top. The hada is well forged and beautiful in very good shape for an older sword with longish wavy masame running here and there entwined with itame and mokume. Ji-nie appears. The style is that of shinogi-zukuri. midare-komi appears in the boshi and the sword has an older feel to it. To say the sword is covered in ji-nie is an understatement. The nie is abundant on the sword. The sword has a mino school feel to it but may also be from the owari school.  This blade should be submitted to shinsa to add more value and for an official appraisal of this sword. This sword is authentic and antique.  We guarantee that it will pass a shinsa if submitted. The mounts are of Dragonfly theme. According to legend, a dead soul can take the shape of a dragonfly, especially during Bon, the Buddhist Day of the Dead. The was fully restored in red lacquer.  The original color was very similar and dated back over a 100 yeas. The menuki are of bees. The sageo and tsuka-Ito are of a royal blue. The tsuba is of iron with dragonfly motif. The fuchi/kashira are also dragonfly themed. The habaki is a beautiful gold gilded and fluted in style as well as the seppa.   Mei: Mumei Date: Late Edo (1700’s-1800’s) Nagasa: 27-3/8...
Echizen Yasutsugu (fss-855)

Echizen Yasutsugu (fss-855)

Echizen Yasutsugu (fss-855) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a good example of the 3rd generation Yasutsugu.  The quality of this sword is very good and has no flaws.  It was a family sword that was mounted in WWII for the war.  It was mounted with an antique tsuba and antique menuki.  This is not common and adds an interesting detention to the mounts.  The blade has good activity and the hada/grain is very rich and dark looking. This sword is in full polish and is in a shirasaya.  The mounts are held together with a wooden tsunagi.  The sword comes with papers from the Nihon Tōken Hozon Kai (日本刀剣保存会) ‒ NTHK from Japan (Japanese sword preservation society). Info on smith:YASUTSUGU (康継), 3rd gen., Kanbun (寛文, 1661-1673), Musashi – “Yasutsugu nanban-tetsu o motte Bushū Edo ni oite kore o saku” (康継以南蛮鉄於武州江戸作之, “made by Yasutsugu with nanban-tetsu in Edo in Musashi province”), real name Shimosaka Umanosuke (下坂右馬助), he adopted later the first name Ichinojō (市之丞), son of the 2nd gen. Yasutsugu, he was not of age when his father died and so a succession dispute arouse which resulted in the splitting to an Edo and an Echizen branch of the Yasutsugu school, it was settled that both were allowed to call themselves 3rd gen., according to tradition he was fully trained by his uncle and he worked later for the bakufu, we know date signatures from the third year of Kanbun (1663) to the third year of Enpō (延宝, 1675), he worked in the style of the 2nd gen. but did not reach his quality, he...
Exquisite Katana (fss 854)

Exquisite Katana (fss 854)

Exquisite Katana (fss-854) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Here we have a beautiful sword that that has been fully restored and is flawless. A bit shorter than the average katana but it is a katana. We feel that this length was made shorter intentionally with the suriage for quick slashing.  The sword is exceptional and is very tightly forged.  The hada is crystal clear and looks very deep and dark.  The hamon is very interesting and unique.  It has a mixture of nie and some nioi adding to its quality.  It has a very faint signature that is not legible but looks ok. The sword looks Mino school in style. The sword has not been submitted to shinsa yet so it would be interesting to find out what they would say about the sword. Mounts are fully restored and are in the same style as they originally came.  The saya is a satsuma red and a black tsukamaki.  The fittings are from the Edo era.  The saya is clean inside to preserve the polish for years to come. This is a flawless antique sword dating back to the (1600’s-1700’s) we feel. Mei: Mumei Date: approximately Momoyama era (1573-1599) Nagasa: 24-3/8 inches Sori: 13.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 28.9 mm Width at the yokote: 21.1 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.8 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: O-suriage Kitae: Itame/mokume Hamon: Gunome mixed with suguba Boshi: Maru Condition: Good polish Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge Image This sword is on consignment. Special Sale Price Sold On Hold Asking price: $6,200.00 (shipping and insurance included) Email us if your interested in this item and...