Bizen Katana (fss-871)

Bizen Katana (fss-871)

Bizen Katana (fss-871) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a koto Bizen katana.  It looks like its from the  muromachi era. The quality of this sword is good and has no flaws. This blade has been shortened and has bohi that are original to the sword. The hamon is a mixture of gunome/choji midare with an itame/mokume mix for hada that is well forged. The koshirai is black lacquered with Same(rayskin) at the top of the saya. The tsuba is sukashi style. The menuki are round and the tsuki-ito is gold with a sageo to match.  The habaki is gold foiled and very good quality. It is in an older polish with minor scuffing.  It would be a great candidate for shinsa someday.  Its mounted solidly and can even be a good sword for iaido training. Bizen Province, now the southwest area of Okayama, was once known as the sword kingdom.Possessing talented swordsmiths and nearby high-quality raw materials accessible by water transportation, Bizen produced the most swords in Japan during the Heian Period (794-1185), beating Yamashiro, Yamato, Sagami and Minohe, the other popular sword-making areas. In the Muromachi period, Harima, Mimasaka and Bizen province had prospered under the protection of the Akamatsu family. Above all, Bizen province has turned out a great many of talented swordsmiths. Supplying the demand of the Age of Provincial Wars in Japan, a large number of swords were made there in the late Muromachi period. Sukesada has become a synonym for the Osafune School though the founder was Mitsutada. It is regrettable that a deluge devastated the School in Osafune...
Shinto Katana (fss 869)

Shinto Katana (fss 869)

Shinto Katana (fss-869) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale An outstanding katana  from the shinto period signed Yamashiro no Kami Fujiwara Kunikane.  This blade has the typical characteristics of blades made in this era. It also has a longish Kissaki and an attractive slight Sori and frosted in nie. The activities in Ha are very beautiful with ji-nie . The hamon is an attractive chu-suguha. The hada is covered in ji-nie and is an itame mixed with beautiful mokume swirls and some masame..  A beautiful ubu with one hole katana this sword from the shinto era boasts of classical like work . The hada has a dense itame and mokume with and a whitish jigane and the hamon is a  chu-sugu-ba in a slight notare.. Ko-nie layers the entire hamon blanketing the nioi-guchi.  This katana is very sound and healthy and a beauty.. The blade is wide and has a very attractive but slight curvature that reminds one of the Shinto period. The quality of the sword is also outstanding. On the omote side by the habaki you will find an interesting area that has been tempered and is frosted in ji-niei.  The hamon is bright and has very good activity. The hada is very wet looking and is forged well with much ji-nie and slight shirakke appears. The overall feel of this blade is one of a well balanced beautiful katana and is very sharp.  The blade is signed but not confirmed as “Yamashiro no Kami Fujiwara Kunikane” due to that point we cannot verify this mei. A great sword in polish that would mount well that could be...
OWARI NOBUTAKA (fss-866)

OWARI NOBUTAKA (fss-866)

OWARI NOBUTAKA (fss-866) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale The Original Nobutaka line of smiths starts with the 1st or Shodai who received the title of Hoki no Kami around 1581. A title which was carried by a total of five generations of smiths with this same name. The Shodai Nobutaka worked during the dawn of the Shinto period from warring states period  through the Keicho era and into the the early 16th century under the Tokugawa Shogunate. He resided in Owari in 1610. He was the approx.50 years of age at this time. He was originally in Mino provence. Tokugawa Yoshinao was placed as the ruler of Owari, and head of the Owari Tokugawa branch at this time so Nobutaka knew that this area would be in need of a smith base. The demand for Nobutaka smiths swords arose as the Owari Tokugawa placed them under direct employment, and they made swords for the Tokugawa Kenjutsu instructor, Yagyu Renyasai Shigekane. For this reason, most Nobutaka works are gassaku (jointly made work) between the generations as they came of age and then passed the school on to the next. The style of the Nobutaka smiths are referred to as “Owari Seki” due  to their Mino origins and characteristics. Swords by the second and third generation have a distinct shape and are referred to as “Kanbun Shinto”. The Kanbun era was relatively short lived and the shape of the swords  were with a shallow sori and a prevalent taper their entire length. This was an effort to capitulate on the style of swordsmanship of the times as well as the...
Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864)

Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864)

Kashu Katsukuni (fss-864) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here: This sword has been fully restored and is in a fresh sashikomi polish.  The workmanship in this katana is excellent and the hamon is very active and beutiful.  The sword has no flaws and is in interesting mounts that are in a waves and crabs motif.  The tsukamaki silk is brown and the saya has stone texture.  The sword is not signed, however the NTHK attribution is to 1st Generation Katsukuni.   KATSUKUNI (勝国), 1st gen., Kanbun (寛文, 1661-1673), Kaga – “Kashū-jū Fujiwara Ieshige saku” (加州住藤原家重作), “Kashū-jū Iyo no Daijō Darani Tachibana Katsukuni” (加州住伊予大掾陀羅尼橘勝国), “Iyo no Daijō Tachibana Katsukuni saku” (伊予大橘勝国作), second son of the 1st gen. Ieshige (家重), real name Matsuto Zenzaburō (松戸善三郎), in Kanbun one (寛文, 1661), he received through the agency of his employer, the Maeda family (前田), from chancellor Yotsuji Yoshiie (四辻吉家) the honorary title Iyo no Daijō (伊予大掾), the clan name Fujiwara used by him so far was changed with this to Tachibana (橘) and the smith name to Katsukuni (勝国), with this he was the 1st gen. Darani Katsukuni but counted himself also as 17th gen. Rai Kuniyoshi (来国吉), he died in the twelfth year of Kanbun (寛文, 1672), itame mixed with masame and a Kanemoto-like sanbonsugi, the interpretations of Ieshige/Katsukuni are insofar different from that of Kanemoto as that they show nie in the valleys between the sanbonsugi elements, kata-sujikai yasurime, jō-saku Mei: Mumei Date: Edo (1600’s-1700’s) Nagasa: 25-1/2 inches Sori: 15.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 31.5 mm Width at the yokote: 21.3 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.5 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu...
(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863)

(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863)

(Bizen) Sukesada (fss-863) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale Item description here: This is a wonderful example of a Bizen school sword that is signed and dated.  This is a legitimately signature.  A signed and dated blade is very interesting for a collector. It reads Bishu Osafune Sukesada, the date is very difficult to make out.  This sword should be submitted to shinsa someday in the future to add to its overall value.  We feel it dates from the1500’s or a bit later from the look and patina of the nakago and the blade itself.  The hamon is a wide suguba with good hataraki/activity. The hada is mokume. The sword has bohi, that are well carved.  This is a very well balanced sword and should also be considered for a quality iaido sword because of the Bohi carvings. The sword has original koshirai and the fuchi/kashira is a married set. The menuki are dragons and the tsuba is iron tsukashi with inlayed brass.  The mounts have some wear from age as the handle wrapping is old silk and the koiguchi has  minor damage that restorable.  The overall look and feel of this sword and its mounts is of a serious samurai sword not meant to be flashy. The history of Bizen swords During the latter half of the Heian  period (794–1185) the Minamoto clan and the Taira clan emerged as the two major warrior clans, with the tachi sword rapidly becoming their weapon of choice. More and more swordsmiths producing various tachi sword styles began to appear in the province of Bizen, which is also the location for quality iron...