Hizen Tadakuni (fss-762)

Hizen Tadakuni (fss-762)

Hizen Tadakuni (fss-762)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale   The Hizen Tadayoshi school of sword smith’s needs no introduction, and are highly prized worldwide.  It all began with the Shodai Tadayoshi who was born in 1572, and known as Hashimoto Shinsaemonjo. Shodai Tadayoshi at age 25 became an apprentice to Umetada Myoju in Kyoto, who is known as the founder of the Shinto Sword. The “Tada” character was given to him by Umetada. After a three year apprenticeship Tadayoshi returned to his home in Hizen Province, where he set up the Hizen Tadayoshi Kaji. The Hizen Tadayoshi Kaji extended through nine mainline generations, ending with the death of the 9th generation Hizen Tadayoshi in 1880. Roger Robertshaw, author of the book “The School of Tadayoshi”, is one of the foremost authorities and collectors of the Hizen Tadayoshi School. In his book, Mr. Robertshaw states, “The Tadayoshi line were the mainline swordsmiths, but equally  as good works were produced by their family and students such as Tadakuni and their descendents.”  As well he states, “Anyone who has had the chance to handle the works of Tadakuni will readily attest to their quality. Blades by this master will immediately impress you as awesome and powerful weapons. The 1st generation or Shodai Hizen Tadakuni was the son of Hizen Yoshiie.  Hizen Yoshiie, the brother and student of Shodai Tadayoshi, worked c. 1625, and his works were rated Josaku.  Hizen Tadakuni, was known to have produced swords of equal quality of any  the mainline Tadayoshi smith’s. Tadakuni’s works were rated Josaku by Fujishiro for his skill and Wazamono in...
Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)

Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)

Harima no Daijō Shigetaka (fss-761)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A SWORD SIGNED AND PAPERED TO:  ” ECHIZEN JU HARIMA DAIJO FUJIWARA SHIGETAKA “ At the beginning of the Shinto period Echizen province (now Fukui pref.), also known as the Azuchi-Momoyama period in the 1570s, Native sword smiths from Seki, Mino provence such as KANETANE 兼種, KANENORI 兼則 had moved and MASANORI 正則 were invited from the capital of Yamashiro to Fukui, Echizen provence. The AOI crest was bestowed on YASUTSUGU 康継 from the Lord Tokugawa and 16 petals KIKU crests were bestowed from the Imperial Court on KUNIKIYO 国淸 of Kunihiro school. They strived to attain the skill for performance, strength and beauty of the martial spirit with the increasing demand from the Samurai. The smith SHIGETAKA 重高 with the official title of Harima-daijo 播磨大掾, had come from Iida, Shinshu provence then moved to Seki, Mino to become a disciple of KANENORI 兼則. SHIGETAKA 重高 had moved to Ichijōdani, Echizen to accept an invitation to work for the Asakura clan along with his master KANENORI 兼則. From the later Muromachi period onwards, Mino province saw a steady outflow of swordsmiths, a trend that saw its peak in the Momoyama and early Edo period. Reason was for the most part the then significant demand for swords and thus local daimyô began to recruit famous masters to work for them on their lands. Mino bldes, or Seki blades in particular, were regarded as being durable and sharp and so a downright wave of migration of Mino/Seki swordsmiths can be seen, especially in the neighboring provinces of Owari and Echizen. As for Echizen, the province also gave a new home...
Authentic Period Daisho (fss-759)

Authentic Period Daisho (fss-759)

Authentic Period Daisho (fss-759)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A True Samurai Daisho, These swords, both Koto pieces (1500’s era) are mounted in a spectacular pair of original Edo period mounts with inlayed style lacquered saya accentuated with abalone throughout. The Motif is of a floral design framed within a textile like curtain and are in pristine condition. The flowers that are used are called Paulowinia, it is a flower pattern referred to in Japanese as Go-Shichi-No-Kiri and was used to represent the Prime minister of Japan in later times. The Menuki are of gold washed dragons and the Kozuka is of a scholar or monks traversing their way to a town in the distance, a very cool scene indeed and quite nice. The Tsuba are of iron with gold inlay of the Musashi plains grass with small winged insects at the bottom both with gold Mon to the maker. The Same or rayskin is of very high quality with a large pattern nodule exposed. The ito is a goldish brown and the sageo is mauvish and white with dragon motif. These sageo with dragon weaved in them are fragile and very old.  They are very unique. The Daisho habaki are both 2-piece with shakudo foil bases and the tops are of silver foil both original to the blades and matching. The Dai-to was attributed to Den Kanesada. A beautiful blade in  pristine polish and loaded with activity from the koto period an O-suriage piece. Within the Sugu-ha there is hotsure, sunagahi and kinsugi. The hada is a dense and beautiful swirling itame and mokume mix. The hada has some course areas that stand out as in...
Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)

Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)

Osafune Sukesada (fss-757)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A one handed katana from the Bizen Sukesada school. TheBlade is of uchi katana length with a hamon of Bizen midare. The nie deki hamon is very well done . Ashi and small kinsuji are seen along with fine mokume itame hada.The boshi is in midare komi and ichimai. Blade is gorgeous and in good condition, especially for its age. The tang is ubu 1 hole and signed with 2 character signature (Sukesada). During the twelfth century Uchigatana started to be used and by the Muromachi Period approximately 1336 to 1573 the uchigatana began to rival the tachi as the sword of choice by warriors. Unlike the tachi, the uchigatana was worn edge-up in the belt,  this and usually being slightly smaller than the tachi was the main difference between the tachi and the uchigatana.  Since it is worn differently, the engraved words on the sword are also opposite to the tachi, making the words still upright instead of upside-down like when one wears the tachi like an uchigatana. This sword became popular for several reasons, the uchigatana was more convenient to wear and did not get in the way of using a polearm as much as a tachi, also the frequency of battles fought on foot and the need for speed on the battlefield, were major reasons for the uchigatana being rapidly accepted and indicated that battlefield combat had grown in intensity. Since it was shorter, it could be used in more confined quarters, such as inside a building. Unlike the tachi, with which the acts of drawing and...
Enomoto Sadahito (fss-756)

Enomoto Sadahito (fss-756)

Enomoto Sadahito (fss-756)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale FROM THE BOOK ” THE NEW GENERATION OF JAPANESE SWORDSMITHS “ Enomoto Sadahito Craft:  Tosho (swordsmith) Born: 1954 Address:  Mishima City, Shizuoka Prefecture Enomoto Sadahito is the son of Enomoto Sadayoshi.  He began training under his father while an elementary student, and became a licensed smith in 1977.  He specializes in the Soshu Den, making swords in the tradition of Masamune and Sadamune.  He also works in the Gassan tradition, making the trademark ayasugi hada. He uses tamahagane as well as old steel and oroshigane.  He makes swords using the kobuse or makuri construction.  True to the Soshu Den, his hamon is a midare with profuse nie, sunagashi, kinsuji, and other hataraki. Sadahito was invited to demonstrate his craft in 1998 at the University of Wisconsin Art Facultyˆ‚s Traditional Japanese Metalwork Seminar.  He is currently the President of the Tokai Branch of the National Association of Swordmakers. Sadahito is a regular entrant in the yearly sword making contests; he has taken the Doryoku Sho, or Effort Award, three times.  He is an up and coming  smith with great potential; surely his future is a bright one.   This Shinsakuto is a beautiful traditionally made sword. With almost a 29″ Nagasa and custom mountings this is a sword to admire. This blade was created to use for training and also for cutting in the traditional Martial Arts as well as for a collector of Shinsakuto blades. A gunome midare hamon with loaded with nie , sunagashi, kinsuji and much more adds to the aesthetic quality of the blade. There is boho which also adds to the balance...