Hizen Masatsugu Daito (fss-882)

Hizen Masatsugu Daito (fss-882)

Hizen Masatsugu Daito (fss-882) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale One  of the  five greatest Shinto smiths  was  Hizen Tadayoshi, a student of Umetada Myojo.The  Hizen style  stands out  and is easily  recognized on this sword.  It has a elegant Shinto sugata, with a strong active hada.  This sword is machi-Okuri and retains a full signature. There is a sugu-ha hamon with ko-maru turnback. The sword was an ancestral blade mounted in military koshirae. The hada is itame covered in konoku-hada a straight of the Hizen smiths. The blade is 27 1/4″ and has an elegant sugata. Comes in WWII era koshirae and were called “kai-gunto” or Naval officer sword mountings. These particular style mounts are of very high quality with a rayskin covered saya and in excellent condition. Its important to note that to retain this signature on the sword it was not cut down.  The Kai-gunto handle was extended.  We have not seen an example this long.  The handle was custom fashioned to preserve this signature.  These are highly sought after by the WWII Japanese sword collector. There is a Samurai family mon on the saya as well as a sword tassel. The saya has the double Obi-tori with Ashi. A beautiful package for both the WWII collector and the collector of Hizen blades. This sword is signed “ HIZEN No KUNI JU MINAMOTO MASATSUGU and the signature is guaranteed by us for one year if submitted to shinsa within that time. The following is a history of the Masatsugu:The first generation Hizen Munetsugu  was originally called Sakai Mitsuemon or Sakai Sanuemon.  His first residence was in Nagase in Saga-gun.  He...
Bizen Katana (fss-881)

Bizen Katana (fss-881)

Bizen Katana (fss-881) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a koto Bizen katana.  It looks like its from the  Muromachi era. The quality of this sword is good and has virtually no flaws. This blade is ubu and there are 2 holes to the sword. There also appears to be a signature and date that is very obscured and not legible but is there. The hamon is a mixture of sugu-ha and slight shallow notare midare with an itame/mokume mix for hada that is well forged. The koshirai is black lacquered and in the handachi style all in suite . The mounts are in good shape and are more in a classical style for a samurai and not meant to be flashy.  The handle has a leather tsukamaki that is black lacquered. The tsukamaki is a very nice detail and not always found in this condition.  The tsuba is a Kinai sukashi style of a Dragon. The menuki are also of dragons in gold wash and the tsuki-ito is a black leather over black Same(rayskin), with a gold and black sageo to match.  The habaki is of good quality. It is in polish.  It would be a great candidate for shinsa someday.  Its mounted solidly . Bizen Province:In the southwest area of Okayama, was once known as the sword kingdom.Possessing talented swordsmiths and nearby high-quality raw materials accessible by water transportation, Bizen produced the most swords in Japan during the Heian Period (794-1185), beating Yamashiro, Yamato, Sagami and Mino, the other popular sword-making areas. In the Muromachi period, Harima, Mimasaka and Bizen province had prospered...
Shintō Jumyō Katana (FSS-878)

Shintō Jumyō Katana (FSS-878)

Shintō Jumyō Katana (FSS-878) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale This sword is a beautiful mumei katana. The hamon is a notare-ish midare  based in chu-suguha with some gunome midare. It is layered with sunagashi and kinsugi the entire length of this tempered edge. There are hints of togare-ba as well. The blade is peppered in Jinie and Yubashiri appears to ghost the hamon in certain places. The hamon also erupts and flares out in the monouchi area and kisses the shinogi. The hada is a prominent swirling  itame covered in ji-nie and chikei also abounds within. Burls of mokume can be seen as well. The blade is O-suriage with 2 mekugi-ana. The boshi is maru The mounts are very nice and add to the overall presence of the blade. The tsuka is a handachi  like style with menuki of gold tiger in bamboo. The fuchi kashira are a deep shakudo finished with gold sea=life in waves. The tsuba is also styled in waves with a dragon in gold. The tsuka is wrapped in black ito and the Sageo is gold, trimming out a red lacquered saya. The habaki is finished with streaking and gilded with gold. The blade is also in shirasaya to protect the finish of the polish. Information on JUMYO:JUMYO(Toshinaga) 寿命 school, it’s founder was born in Seki town, Mino province in Tensho 8 (1580), real name was Kondo Sukezaemon 近藤助左衛門. He had moved to Kiyosu castle town during Keicho(1596-1614) period and the enjoyed Tango-no-kami 丹後守 title in Kanei 2 (1625). JUMYO school had been prospered in 5 generations during Edo period under the patronage of Owari Tokugawa clans....
SHOWA AKIYUKI (fss-867)

SHOWA AKIYUKI (fss-867)

SHOWA AKIYUKI (fss-867) New Item Available Sold On Hold Special Sale AKIYUKI (昭行), Shōwa (昭和, 1926-1989), Gunma – “Akiyuki” (昭行), real name KuriharaWashio (栗原鷲雄), he worked as a rikugun-jumei-tōshō This gendai-to sword is a wonderful katana. The hada is A TIGHT IOTAME/MOKUME MIX. The hamon is based in sugu-ha made up of a gunome midare with a tight nioi-gucchi. The boshi is also ko-maru of gunome midare. This sword is wide healthy blade a bit on the larger side.  A beautiful sword for mounting and training.  The term “gendai or gendaito”  is used by collectors to refer to traditionally made blades; those which have folded steel and are water tempered. The Japanese require that for a sword to be “gendaito” it must be made of tamehagane or oroshigane even though it is impossible to tell what a sword is made from after the sword is finished and polished. Swords made of forge folded commercial mill steel look the same as those made of tamehagane after they are polished although some collectors feel that swords made of tamehagane are more likely to have active hamon and more prominent hada than those made of folded mill steel. Gendaito Swords Explained The term “gendaito” also refers to Japanese swords produced during 1876 to 1945. Japanese bladesmiths have produced swords for centuries, with some of the region’s first swords dating back to around 300 to 500 A.D. There were still swords in Japan before this era, though they were believed to have come from China. It wasn’t until 300 to 500 A.D. when Japan began making its own swords. Modern swords produced in Japan from 1876 to 1945...